PR Firm Launches Campaign To Defend Ecosystems

Deforestation Promoting Climate Change, Loss Of Biodiversity

Deforestation generates about 20 percent of greenhouse gasses, which contribute to global warming and climate change. Deforestation also cripples our planet’s ability to filter carbon dioxide from our air. Unfortunately, deforestation also threatens entire watersheds, endangered species and endangered cultures around the world. An international PR firm based in Phoenix, Arizona has launched a program to help reverse deforestation, while defending entire ecosystems.

If all CO2 emissions stopped today, climate change will still intensify because of existing carbon in the atmosphere. Energy conservation, renewable energy and sustainable agriculture are vital, but we need proven carbon capture strategies to help restore balance to our atmosphere. Forest conservation is more important than ever.

wildlife conservation and deforestation

“Thousands of community stakeholders across East Africa are ready to act now,” said Gary Chandler founder of both Crossbow Communications and its subsidiary Sacred Seedlings. “They can help us all fight global climate change, while defending critical ecosystems in Tanzania, Kenya and beyond. We’re launching a campaign to help them secure the resources to succeed.”

According to Chandler, several NGOs, including the Mellowswan Foundation Africa-Tanzania have plans to save remaining forests in the region, while promoting reforestation, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. The program will plant more than 10 million new seedlings just in the Kilimanjaro ecosystem.

A new report by the United Nations Environment Programme says that protecting East Africa’s mountain ecosystems would safeguard the region’s $7 billion tourism industry, not to mention the lives of millions of people and iconic endangered species.

“Across the continent, the damage done to these ecosystems is depriving people of the basic building blocks of life,” said Erik Solheim, head of UN Environment agency.

deforestation Tanzania and Kenya

He said Mt. Kilimanjaro was an example of how climate change was severely damaging Africa’s mountains and the people who depend on them. Mt. Kilimanjaro, the highest in Africa, contributes to more than a third of Tanzania’s revenue from tourism but is facing several problems, ranging from shrinking glaciers to rampant wild fires. As climate change intensifies, it is essential that governments act swiftly to prevent more harm and more downward momentum. The report urges Tanzania to protect the mountain’s water catchment area by reforestation, investing in early warning systems and making climate adaptation a top priority.

Forests are critical to the way Earth functions. They lock up vast amounts of carbon and release oxygen. They influence rainfall, filter fresh water and prevent flooding and soil erosion. They produce wild foods, fuel wood and medicines for the people who live in and around them. They are storehouses of potential future crop varieties and genetic materials with untapped healing qualities. Wood and other fibre grown in forests can be used as a renewable fuel or as raw material for paper, packaging, furniture or housing.

While the pressures on forests vary across regions, the biggest cause of deforestation is expanding agriculture – including commercial livestock and major crops such as palm oil and soy. According to Chandler, Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, carbon capture, reforestation, urban forestry,sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems, including millions of people who live in the region.

endangered species Africa

Loss of forests isn’t the only problem in East Africa. Tanzania may have lost half its elephant population since 2007. It could be wiped out entirely in just seven years. Kenya’s wildlife also is under assault like never before. Adding to the crisis, there has been loss of wildlife habitat and biodiversity as a result of fragmentation and loss of critical ecosystem linkages and over-exploitation of the natural habitats. This loss of habitat brings humans and wildlife into more and more conflict over food, water and space–which means more bloodshed.

Tanzania’s elephant population declined from an estimated 109,000 elephants in 2009 to around 70,000 in 2012. Around 30 elephants are killed for their ivory every day, almost 11,000 each year and rising. It’s estimated that more than 35,000 African elephants were killed for ivory in 2012. The number keeps rising.

Read The Full Story at http://crossbowcommunications.com/deforestation-contributing-to-climate-change-loss-of-biodiversity/ To donate, please click here.

PR firm climate change and deforestation

Crossbow Communications is a full-service advertising agency and public relations firm in Denver, Colorado and Phoenix, Arizona. The firm specializes in issue management and public affairsCrossbow has helped influence public opinion and public policy around the world. It has won state and national awards, while setting state and national records for our clients. For more information, write to Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com

Rainforest Concert By Sting, James Taylor, Paul Simon, More

Promoting Forest Conservation

Sting and his wife, actress Trudie Styler, will be joined by some big names on April 17 for the biennial Rainforest Fund Benefit Concert at Carnegie Hall. Paul Simon will join James Taylor, Dionne Warwick, Ivy Levan, trumpeter Chris Botti and opera singer Renée Fleming in campaigning for environmental conservation and to help the indigenous people who live in the Amazon rainforest in Brazil and over 20 other countries.

forest conservation Amazon

“This year is the Rainforest Fund’s 25th anniversary,” Styler and Sting said in a statement. “Its work to protect rainforests around the globe for the people who live there and for all of us is more important than ever.”

The Rainforest Foundation Fund is a charitable foundation dedicated to the preservation of the rainforest by defending the rights of the indigenous peoples living there. The fund supports the field-based projects of its three sister organizations: Rainforest Foundation UK, whose work focuses in Africa; Rainforest Foundation US, whose work focuses in Central and South America; and Rainforest Foundation Norway, whose work focuses in Southeast Asia; though all three organizations have projects worldwide.

deforestation and climate change

The fund works by granting money via these three organizations, and other NGOs, to programs and projects on the ground that support the attempts of indigenous rainforest peoples to assert and defend their rights, to define and promote sustainable development in their communities, and to challenge the activities and practices of governments or other entities which damage their environment and lands. The programs and projects are developed in partnership with local communities and representative indigenous NGOs.

Source: http://www.jambands.com/news/2014/03/21/paul-simon-james-taylor-and-more-to-join-sting-for-rainforest-fund-benefit-concert#.Uy5sIK1dUqk

climate change and deforestation

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, carbon capture, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems.

Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

REDD Funding For Forest Projects Needs Reform

Bureaucracy Impedes Solutions To Deforestation

Concerns among developing countries about REDD+ “aid conditionality” — development aid payouts made based on achieving certain greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reductions — are creating a barrier in international climate negotiations, a new report states.

palm oil plantation deforestation

A REDD+ Effectiveness Assessment should be established to verify emission reductions at a national level, so that targets are transparent and measurable, said Michael Dutschke, director of biocarbon consult, an international network for landscape management, climate and biodiversity, in his recent paper “Key issues in REDD+ verification”.

“Much technical work to do with forest monitoring systems and reporting emissions is put at risk by the disagreements related to reliable finance for REDD+ countries and to verification — issues that are intrinsically linked,” he said.

Debates over how to finance REDD+ — the UN-backed framework for reducing emissions caused by deforestation and forest degradation — and how to measure, report and verify (MRV) carbon emissions, have been major sticking points in climate change negotiations.

The original aim in 2007 was to fund the REDD+ program from carbon emissions trading, but with weak demand in carbon markets, most funding for the scheme, which is still in its early stages, comes from development aid budgets. This ties aid funds to results-based actions, which must prove that measurable improvements have been made, Dutschke said.

Verification has become a barrier in the negotiation process because it reminds negotiators from recipient countries of aid conditionality, which usually means aid is linked to the acquisition of goods and services from the donor country, he said.

Further complications of REDD+ financing will occur if there are no regulated verification procedures, limiting the potential for long-term predictable finance to help developing countries, according to the research paper.

deforestation and climate change

Deforestation and forest degradation — mainly caused by agricultural expansion, converting forests to pastureland, infrastructure development and fires — account for 10 to 15 percent  of all GHG emissions, more than the entire global transportation sector and second only to the energy sector.

Carbon markets are intended to open the door for investments in emission-reduction in developing countries. However, most of the $17.2 billion funding pledged for projects to protect standing forests has been contributed to developing countries through aid.

The funds are meant to create and support strategies for REDD+ climate change mitigation efforts based on country-specific causes of deforestation, Dutschke said.

Under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), developed countries produce reports on atmospheric emissions and removals from land-use related activities and forestry. Bilateral and even multilateral REDD+ funding is subject to legal agreements between the parties involved and usually includes MRV procedures, he said, whereas international funding under the UNFCCC will be regulated by an internationally binding mechanism. Unless verification and other solid accounting principles are agreed upon, funding for REDD+ risks becoming more fragmented.

Deforestation News via http://sacredseedlings.com/carbon-capture-reforestation/

climate change and deforestation

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, carbon capture, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems.

Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com