Carbon Capture Market Gaining Momentum

Fossil Fuels Only Part Of The Equation

The global carbon capture and storage (CCS) market is expected to exceed US $8.75 billion by 2025, according to a new report. The rising global energy demand along with the growing awareness towards reducing carbon dioxide emissions in most of the industrial economies is anticipated to drive the CCS market.

Currently, meaningful industrial CO2 capture is required particularly in the power sector. The increasing adoption of gas injection techniques for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) across several matured petroleum reserves globally is expected to be one of the key factors driving CCS demand.

reforestation and forest conservation

Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is expected to account for the highest demand with a net worth estimated to reach over 6.18 billion by 2025. Prevalence of factors such as depleting oil reserves globally coupled with heavy dependence on crude oil imports mainly in the Asia Pacific region is anticipated to be one of the major reasons driving the demand for EOR activities globally.

CCS requirement in high purity industrial applications such as natural gas processing, coal to liquid (CTL), ammonia, and hydrogen production facilities holds immense potential for project demonstration. The segment is estimated to witness the fastest growth in terms volume of CO2 captured. Carbon capture and storage demand in the industrial sector is expected to grow at a CAGR of 6.2% from 2016 – 2025.

deforestation and climate change

Further key findings from the report suggest:

  • The global CCS demand exceeded 61 million t in 2015 and is estimated to grow at a CAGR of 6% from 2016 – 2025.
  • Post-combustion capture technology is anticipated to grow at the highest CAGR of 15.6% from 2016 – 2025.
  • Pre-combustion capture technology demand in the US is estimated to exceed a total volume of 80 million t by 2025.
  • Stringent regulatory framework for cleaner environment coupled with increasing CO2 injection EOR technique in most of the depleted hydrocarbon basins are expected to be the major factors driving demand in North America.
  • The Asia Pacific CCS industry is expected to grow at the highest CAGR of 9.7% from 2016 – 2024.
  • Key players include Shell CANSLV, AkerSolutions, Statoil, Linde Engineering, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and Sulzer.
  • ACTL with North West Sturgeon Refinery CO2 Stream in Canada, Future Gen 2.0 Project in US, Preheat CCS & Don Valley Power Projects in UK are some of the upcoming projects over the next few years.

Carbon Capture News via https://www.hydrocarbonengineering.com/gas-processing/26122016/carbon-capture-storage-market-to-2025/

Tanzania and Kenya wildlife conservation

Trees and forests can capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air, return the oxygen to the atmosphere and store the carbon for centuries. Deforestation is disrupting this vital system, while contributing to global warming and climate change. Trees and forests can absorb some of the carbon dioxide that we all produce in our daily lives. Unfortunately, our remaining forests are under siege, which also threatens endangered species and entire nations. We can reverse the trend now by demanding forest conservation and reforesting as much land as possible.

reforestation and climate change solution

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. It’s also promoting forest conservation, reforestation, sustainable agriculture, and wildlife conservation through it’s subsidiary–Sacred Seedlings. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com to join our network.

Reforestation Restoring Hope In Battle Against Climate Change

Editor’s Note: We’re pleased to see the groundswell for forest conservation and reforestation gaining more traction every day. We have nine projects ready to go in five nations across East Africa. Please visit our East Africa Plan to learn how you can help.

Deforestation Killing More Than Trees 

By Justin Gillis, New York Times

Over just a few decades, Costa Rica chopped down a majority of its ancient forests. But after a huge conservation push and a wave of reforestation, trees now blanket more than half of this nation. Far to the south, the Amazon rainforest was once being vaporized for farming, but Brazil has slowed the loss in recent years.

stop deforestation global warming

Meanwhile, Indonesia has made bold new promises in the past few months to halt deforestation. Business interests with clout are jumping on board. Measurable action remains to be seen.

In the battle to limit the risks of climate change, it has been clear for decades that focusing on the world’s immense tropical forests — saving the ones that are left, and perhaps letting new ones grow — is the single most promising near-term strategy.

Forests play a very large role in the carbon cycle of the planet. Trees pull the main greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, out of the air and lock the carbon away in their wood and in the soil beneath them. Destroying them, typically by burning, pumps much of the carbon back into the air, contributing to climate change.

Over time, humans have cut down or damaged at least three-quarters of the world’s forests, and that destruction has accounted for much of the excess carbon that is warming the planet.

But now, driven by a growing environmental movement in countries that are home to tropical forests, and by mounting pressure from Western consumers who care about sustainable practices, corporate and government leaders are making a fresh push to slow the cutting — and eventually to halt it. In addition, plans are being made by some of those same leaders to encourage forest regrowth on such a giant scale that it might actually pull a sizable fraction of human-released carbon dioxide out of the air and lock it into long-term storage.

reforest Tanzania

With the recent signs of progress, long-wary environmental groups are permitting themselves a burst of optimism about the world’s forests.

“The public should take heart,” said Rolf Skar, who helps lead forest conservation work for the environmental group Greenpeace. “We are at a potentially historic moment where the world is starting to wake up to this issue, and to apply real solutions.”

Still, Greenpeace and other groups expect years of hard work as they try to hold business leaders and politicians accountable for the torrent of promises they have made lately. The momentum to slow or halt deforestation is fragile, for many reasons. And even though rich Western governments have hinted for years that they might be willing to spend tens of billions of dollars to help poor countries save their forests, they have allocated only a few billion dollars.

Around the world, trees are often cut down to make room for farming, and so the single biggest threat to forests remains the need to feed growing populations, particularly an expanding global middle class with the means to eat better. Saving forests, if it can be done, will require producing food much more intensively, on less land.

“For thousands of years, the march of civilization has been associated with converting natural ecosystems to crops that serve only man,” said Glenn Hurowitz, a managing director at Climate Advisers, a consultancy in Washington. “What’s happening now is that we are trying to break that paradigm. If that succeeds, it’s going to be a major development in human history.”

Deep inside a Costa Rican rainforest, white-faced capuchin monkeys leapt through the tree tops. Nunbirds and toucans flew overhead, and a huge butterfly, flashing wings of an iridescent blue, fluttered through the air.

Ignoring the profusion of life around him, Bernal Paniagua Guerrero focused his gaze on a single 20-foot tree, placing a tape measure around the spindly trunk and calling a number out to his sister, Jeanette Paniagua Guerrero, who recorded it on a clipboard.

With that record, the black manú tree entered the database of the world’s scientific knowledge. Its growth will be tracked year by year until it dies a natural death — or somebody decides to chop it down for the valuable, rot-resistant wood.

The Paniaguas and their co-worker, Enrique Salicette Nelson, work for an American scientist, Robin Chazdon, helping her chronicle a remarkable comeback. Costa Rica is considered a forest success. Much of the country’s old-growth forest was lost from the 1940s to the 1980s, but then new policies stemmed the loss, and forests have regrown to cover more than half the country. Serious threats persist, including a boom in pineapple farming that gives landowners an incentive to cut down recovering forest plots.

jaguar conservation and deforestation in Amazon

A large, intact forest area still exists in Costa Rica, extending to the south and east into Panama. The dense, natural forest remains unfragmented by roads and has not been used for timber production.

Cuatro Rios, the forest they were standing in one recent day, looked, to a casual eye, as if it must have been there forever. Trees stretched as high as 100 feet, and a closed canopy of leaves cast the understory into deep shade — one hallmark of a healthy tropical rain forest.

In fact, the land was a cattle pasture only 45 years ago. When the market for beef fell, the owners let the forest reclaim it. Now the Cuatro Rios forest, near the tiny village of La Virgen, is a study plot for Dr. Chazdon, an ecologist from the University of Connecticut, who has become a leading voice in arguing that large-scale forest regrowth can help to solve some of the world’s problems.

Indeed, forests are already playing an outsize role in limiting the damage humans are doing to the planet. For the entire geologic history of the earth, carbon in various forms has flowed between the ground, the air and the ocean. A large body of scientific evidence shows that the amount of carbon in the air at any given time, in the form of carbon dioxide, largely determines the planet’s temperature.

The burning of coal, oil and natural gas effectively moves carbon out of the ground and into the active carbon cycle operating at the earth’s surface, causing a warming of the globe that scientists believe is more rapid now than in any similar period of geologic history.

Though the higher temperatures are causing extensive problems, including heat waves and rising seas, the increasing carbon dioxide also acts as a sort of plant fertilizer. The gas is the primary source of the carbon that plants, using the energy of sunlight, turn into sugars and woody tissue.

Scientific reports suggest that 20 percent to 25 percent of the carbon dioxide that people are pumping into the air is being absorbed by trees and other plants, which keep taking up more and more even as human emissions keep rising.

But when people damage or destroy forests, that puts carbon dioxide into the air, worsening the warming problem. Historically, forests have been chopped down all over the planet. Now they are actually regrowing across large stretches of the Northern Hemisphere, and the most worrisome destruction is occurring in relatively poor countries in the tropics.

Scientists concluded decades ago that deforestation must be stopped, both to limit climate change and to conserve the world’s biological diversity. These days, they are also coming to understand the huge potential of new or recovering forests to help pull dangerous emissions out of the air.

“Every time I hear about a government program that is going to spend billions of dollars on some carbon capture and storage program, I just laugh and think, what is wrong with a tree?” said Nigel Sizer, director of forest programs at the World Resources Institute, a think tank in Washington. “All you have to do is look out the window, and the answer is there.”

Scientists are still trying to figure out how much of a difference an ambitious forest regrowth strategy could make. But a leading figure in the discussion — Richard A. Houghton, acting president of the Woods Hole Research Center in Massachusetts — has argued for turning some 1.2 billion acres of degraded or marginally productive agricultural land into forests.

That is an exceedingly ambitious figure, equal to about half the land in the United States. But researchers say it would be possible, in principle, if farming in poor countries became far more efficient. Some countries have already pledged to restore tens of millions of acres.

Dr. Houghton believes that if his target were pursued aggressively, and coupled with stronger efforts to protect existing forests, the rapid growth of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere could be slowed sharply or possibly even halted.

That, he believes, would give the world a few decades for an orderly transition away from fossil fuels. “This is not a solution, but it would help us buy some time,” Dr. Houghton said.

The Amazon, spreading across nine countries of South America, is the world’s largest tropical forest. The majority of the Amazon is in Brazil, which for decades treated it as a limitless resource.

Sometimes aided by United States government funding for development, Brazil encouraged road construction that effectively opened the forest to settlement, including illegal land grabs. Crews harvested select trees for timber and then cut or burned the rest to make room for cattle ranching and soybean farming.

Deforestation was so rampant that by the middle of the last decade, 17 percent of the Amazon had been cut, and millions more acres had been damaged. Environmental groups worldwide sounded the alarm, as did indigenous and traditional peoples whose ancestors had lived in the forest for thousands of years.

deforestation and climate change

Global Deforestation

Since the dawn of civilization, humans have destroyed or badly damaged perhaps three-quarters of the world’s forests. This map shows loss and gain of forest cover over the last decade, including mechanical removal, fire and disease. Since the 19th century, forests have been re-established across large areas of the Northern Hemisphere, but in the tropics, they are still under broad assault.

As deforestation hit a peak in 2004, the Brazilian government came under international condemnation, and it began trying to halt the destruction. In 2006, environmental groups found a way to bring marketplace pressure to bear.

Crops grown on deforested land, notably soybeans, were being used to produce meat for Western companies like McDonald’s, creating a potential liability in the eyes of their customers. Greenpeace invaded McDonald’s restaurants and plastered posters of Ronald McDonald wielding a chain saw. That company and others responded by pressuring their suppliers, who imposed a moratorium on products linked to deforestation.

The Brazilian government used satellites to step up its monitoring, cut off loans to some farmers in counties with high deforestation rates, and used aggressive police tactics against illegal logging and clearing. Brazilian state governments and large business groups, including some beef producers, joined the efforts.

The intense pressure resulted in a sharp drop in deforestation, by 83 percent, over the past decade. Moreover, the Brazilian ministry of agriculture began to focus on helping farmers raise yields without needing additional land.

Not only were millions of acres of forest saved, but the carbon dioxide kept out of the air by Brazil’s success far exceeded anything any other country had ever done to slow global warming. Norway put up substantial funds to aid the effort, but otherwise, Brazil did it without much international help.

With so little money from abroad, the gains in Brazil are considered fragile, especially if a future government were to lose interest in forest protection. Daniel C. Nepstad, an American forest scientist who has worked in Brazil for decades and now heads a group called the Earth Innovation Institute, said, “We could still see a huge slide backward.”

Deforestation was rampant in Brazil until a decade ago, but campaigns by environmental groups and the Brazilian government slashed the rate of forest loss by 83 percent. That means Brazil has done more than any other country in the world to slow the emissions leading to global warming. It has received relatively little financial help from richer countries.

Indonesia deforestation

Indonesia’s Deforestation

With deforestation hopefully easing in Brazil, Indonesia is becoming a big test of the environmental groups’ strategy. Deforestation is rampant there, with people chopping down even national forests with impunity. The biggest reason is to clear land for the lucrative production of vegetable oil from the fruit of a type of palm tree (for palm oil).

Just a handful of companies sell the oil — used in a wide array of consumer goods like soap, ice cream, confections and lipstick — into global markets, and the environmental groups have been targeting these big middlemen. Companies controlling the bulk of the global palm-oil trade have recently signed no-deforestation pledges, and Indonesia’s influential chamber of commerce recently threw its weight behind a demand for new forest legislation in the country.

But even if Indonesia takes strong action, there are fears that the gains could prove fleeting. The economic incentive to chop down forests remains powerful, and crackdowns on deforestation can just spur profiteers to go elsewhere.

“Asian companies are rushing into Africa and grabbing as much land as possible,” said Mr. Hurowitz, of Climate Advisers. “That’s kind of scary.”

Still, with hopes running high that the world may finally be rounding a corner on the deforestation problem, attention is turning to the possibility of large-scale forest regrowth.

Dr. Chazdon believes strongly in halting deforestation, but she says that many of the plots of old-growth forest that have already been saved are too small to ensure the long-term survival of the plants and animals in them. Forest expansion onto nearby land could help to conserve that biological diversity, in addition to pulling carbon dioxide out of the air.

Indonesia is now the world’s hot spot for deforestation, losing more forest each year than Brazil despite being a much smaller country. The purpose of much of the clearing is to grow palm oil for use in Western consumer products like ice cream and soap. Companies and environmental groups have recently promised a bold new crackdown.

But the strategy presents many challenges. It will require abandoning marginal agricultural land, meaning the remaining farms will have to become more efficient to keep up with demand for food, as well as a growing demand for biofuels. And some scientists have warned that if the strategy is poorly executed, agriculture could merely be pushed away from forests into grasslands or savannas, which themselves contain huge amounts of carbon that could escape into the atmosphere.

Costa Rica, a “green republic” famous worldwide for its efforts to protect forests, shows how difficult a forest restoration strategy can be in practice.

Legal protection is minimal for much of the forest that has grown there in recent decades. The workers who help Dr. Chazdon track her plots often see telltale signs of illegal hunting and logging, and they say the authorities are lax about stopping it. “So many ugly things happen that we just lose a little faith,” said Mr. Paniagua, one of the workers.

Moreover, a wave of pineapple production to supply a growing world market is sweeping the country, tempting many owners to clear their land again. Growing Chinese demand, in particular, has raised the fear that “the whole of Costa Rica will be paved in pineapples,” said Carlos de la Rosa, director of La Selva Biological Station, a famed research outpost where Dr. Chazdon does much of her work.

But for now, the second-growth forests of Costa Rica, covering roughly 14 percent of the land area of the country, at least show what may be possible if the world gets more ambitious about tackling global warming. Brazil, too, is beginning to see regrowth on a large scale in the Amazon, and is spending millions to restore forests along its Atlantic coast.

Decades of watching the Costa Rican forests recover have taught Dr. Chazdon that, at least in areas that still have healthy forests nearby to supply seeds, the main thing human beings need to do is just get out of the way. After all, forests were recovering from fires and other natural calamities long before people ever came along to chop them down.

“The forests know how to do this,” Dr. Chazdon said. “They’ve been doing it forever, growing back.”

Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/24/science/earth/restored-forests-are-making-inroads-against-climate-change-.html?smid=tw-share&_r=0

climate change and deforestation

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems. Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

Latin American Countries Will Restore 20 Million Hectares Of Forest

Eight South American Countries Promise To Restore Damaged Lands

A coalition of eight Latin American countries just announced plans to replant up to 20 million hectares of forests by 2020, an area five times the size of Switzerland. Unfortunately, Brazil was not on the list.

Mexico, Peru, Colombia, Guatemala, Ecuador, El Salvador, Chile and Costa Rica made the pledge on the sidelines of UN climate change talks in Lima, backed by US$365 million from donor organizations.

“We are losing our forests at a fast speed,” said Juan Manuel Benitez, Peru’s Minister of Agriculture and Irrigation, at the launch of the initiative. “It is putting at risk our future, our water and our land.”

deforestation and climate change

He explained that Peru has invested US$50 million to investigate the causes of deforestation, which is linked to 60 percent of its annual emissions.

Tackling deforestation is seen as a critical part of efforts to secure a global greenhouse gas emissions reduction agreement in Paris next December.

The transformation of 13 million hectares of forests a year into pastures for animals, croplands or other industrial uses accounts for 20 percent of annual emissions.

“Protection of forests and restoration of degraded lands should be a fundamental part of a strong, universal climate agreement to be finalized at the COP in Paris in 2015,” said Andrew Steer from the World Resources Institute, one of the organizations backing this effort.

“Standing forests and other plant-rich landscapes store climate-warming carbon dioxide, keeping it out of the atmosphere, making forests an important component of both national and international efforts to curb global warming.”

The announcement is the latest sign governments are slowly getting to grips with the destruction of some of the world’s most biodiverse habitats and valuable stores of carbon.

In 2011 governments of South Korea, Costa Rica, the US, China, Rwanda and Brazil agreed to restore 150 million hectares of land by 2030.

And in September 2014 the UN reported 150 governments, companies, civil society and indigenous peoples had backed proposals to cut forest losses 50 percent by 2020, and end it by 2030.

But despite these initiatives forest communities say they are facing an unprecedented number of threats from developers keen to extract valuable raw materials from their lands and open up new farming areas.

Last week widows of four Brazilian tribesmen murdered by suspected illegal loggers travelled to the UN talks in Peru’s capital to highlight the dangers they are now facing.

“We have never been under so much pressure,” said Edwin Vásquez, co-author and president of indigenous people’s network COICA.

forest tribes and forest conservation

Cándido Mezua-Salazar, a tribal chief from Panama, said forests could prosper if governments ensured traditional customs were protected.

“We are part of the forest,” he said, “but out relationship with the earth is suffering and we are all fully responsible.”

Mezua-Salazar said he wanted to see any international climate agreement deliver “clear rules” to protect the rights of tribal peoples.

The UN Challenge

Negotiators in Lima hope to understand better how deforestation will be addressed under any new 2015 agreement. Hopes have been pinned on a marked-based mechanism known as REDD+ that could see forest communities paid to protect forests. But since its inception it has been beset by fears over transparency and accountability, both in terms of flows of money and the accuracy of forest inventories.

Rules over how the variety of projects that fall under its umbrella were agreed at UN talks in Warsaw last year. Its supporters now say it needs strong financial backing from the international community and the private sector. The World Bank, which runs two of the three main bodies charged with distributing funds for REDD+, says it its committed to ensuring costs for anyone applying for help are as low as possible.

“One of the most important things for us is streamlining the finance from donors,” said the Bank’s head of climate change, Rachel Kyte. “What you need to be able to do is be able to engage with one process. “So what we’re doing is changing the way that we will manage all those different windows so we will have one conversation with a country, and we will figure out how the different regulations with different governments and different governance operate, and we’ll waive that charge for the client.”

Source: http://www.rtcc.org/2014/12/07/latin-american-coalition-to-restore-20-million-hectares-of-forest/#sthash.hLFYFVP7.dpuf

climate change and deforestation

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems. Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

UN Can Help Reforest Africa As Carbon Capture Strategy

Reforestation Can Reduce Emissions From Deforestation, Degradation

The UN Development Program (UNDP) will assist African countries in implementing projects on reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD).

UNDP Kenya Deputy Country Director Fernando Edjang said on Thursday that African states will benefit from financial and technical support to scale up REDD projects and propel low-carbon development.

wildlife conservation and deforestation

“Climate change has worsened human suffering in Africa and the international community will support reforestation projects to boost communities’ resilience,” Edjang said.

Loss of forest cover in Africa due to urbanization, population pressure and changing land use practices is to blame for rapid carbon emission. Multilateral agencies have channeled funds to governments and communities to help restore degraded forest ecosystems.

Edjang said that REDD projects have accelerated green growth while creating incomes for women and youth across Sub-Saharan Africa.

reforestation and climate change

“The majority of the REDD projects funded under the UN-REDD program yielded results. Restoring a country’s forest cover has multiple benefits to the community and the national economy,” Edjang explained..

UNDP supports national governments to develop institutional and policy frameworks that would facilitate design and implementation of REDD projects. Edjang said that under-funding, incoherent policies and limited public awareness have undermined implementation of reforestation projects in Sub-Saharan Africa.

“Countries must address governance hiccups that fuel deforestation and sensitize communities on the value of protecting their forest ecosystems,” Edjang said, adding that transparency and policy reforms are key to sustain climate financing in Africa.

The UNDP official said African countries should borrow best practices from Brazil and Indonesia to implement community-owned REDD projects.

Africa wildlife conservation

Estelle Fasch, REDD Specialist at UNDP, emphasized that investments in reforestation will have positive impacts on the economy and ecosystems.

“African countries should assess key drivers of deforestation and initiate homegrown projects to reverse this phenomenon,” Fasch said, adding that establishment of a sound legal framework will enhance benefits sharing on REDD projects.

Source: http://www.coastweek.com/3748-special-report-02.htm

climate change and deforestation

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems. Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

UPS Foundation Awards $2.5 Million To Support Global Reforestry

Global Forestry Initiative Celebrates Fourth Year

The UPS Foundation, the philanthropic arm of UPS®, awarded nearly $2.5 million to nonprofit organizations with an emphasis on environmental sustainability. The UPS Foundation’s largest environmental grant recipient is The Nature Conservancy, a leading conservation organization that works globally to protect ecologically important lands and bodies of water.

Launched in 2011, UPS’s Global Forestry Initiative goal is to help plant, protect and preserve trees in urban and rural areas and critical forests around the world. UPS’s ongoing contribution to The Nature Conservancy continues to support the program for reforestation in the U.S., Brazil, Guatemala, Haiti and China. Through this effort, The Nature Conservancy will be directly responsible for planting 700,000 trees in at-risk or eroded ecosystems. The grant will also be used to support the Responsible Asia Forest Trade Dialogues program with the EU and to support the Healthy Trees, Healthy Cities Initiative, which promotes urban forestry.

reforestation and carbon capture

The company also announced that it has surpassed the company’s 2014 tree planting goals, planting more than 1.7 million trees this grant cycle. Since 2012, The UPS Foundation and UPS employees have planted more than 3 million trees across 47 countries to support the environment.

The UPS Foundation has four philanthropic pillars which are funded in local communities throughout the year. UPS’s global programs are funded quarterly and in 2013, over 4,300 nonprofit and NGO organizations worldwide received funding. The philanthropic pillars are Community Safety, Diversity, Environment and Volunteerism.

“At UPS, we believe volunteers are at the heart of all efforts at building community resiliency and they are critical to help sustain our environment,” said Eduardo Martinez, president of The UPS Foundation. “Through volunteer service hours committed by UPS employees as well as our environmental grants program, The UPS Foundation is dedicated to delivering time and resources to enhance environmental stewardship, especially in support of carbon reduction, environmental research, education and conservation.”

deforestation and climate change

In addition to The Nature Conservancy, nine other organizations are recipients of The UPS Foundation’s 2014 environmental grants. They include:

Student Conservation Association Inc. (SCA) for the SCA National Conservation Internship program for college students interested in careers in environmental stewardship;

World Business Council for Sustainable Development to support the organization’s annual conference by providing organizational support around sustainable development programs;

World Resources Institute toward sustainability research to support of The Greenhouse Gas Protocol and Reducing Methane Emissions from Natural Gas Systems;

World Wildlife Fund to build local capacity for tropical rainforest restoration and reforestation in Africa, Asia and Latin American through 10 Education for Global Reforestation grants;

DonorsChoose.org for environmental education classroom projects submitted by public school teachers in rural communities;

Earth Day Network to help the Trees for Communities project plant 380,000 trees in Ethiopia, Kenya and Tanzania as well as throughout the Boreal Forest in Canada, Russia and Norway;

Keep America Beautiful, Inc., for 30 community planting tree grants and five post-recovery tree planting grants;

National Arbor Day Foundation for reforestation projects in the U.S. and the Boreal Forest in Canada; and

National Park Foundation toward continued backing of the reforestation of reclaimed mining land which supports the UPS Global Forestry Initiative at the new Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, Penn., honoring the heroes of Sept. 11.

Read more: http://www.benzinga.com/news/14/10/4910998/the-ups-foundation-awards-nearly-2-5m-in-environmental-grants#ixzz3GBKSgNEG

climate change and deforestation

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems. Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

Nations Will Reforest Land To Fight Climate Change

Bonn Challenge Promotes Reforestation

By Jeremy Hance, Monga Bay

In 2011, Germany and the International Union for the Conservation of Nature launched the Bonn Challenge, which pledged to restore 150 million hectares of degraded and deforested lands by 2020. Several countries have already made commitments—including the U.S.—but this week at the UN Climate Summit four more jumped on board.

deforestation and climate change

The Democratic Republic of the Congo committed to restoring 8 million hectares, Uganda committed to 2.5 million hectares, and Guatemala committed to restoring 1.2 million hectares. But the largest commitment in the group came from Ethiopia, which pledged to restore forests on 22 million hectares or about 22 percent of its land mass. In total this week’s pledges add up to 33.7 million hectares, an area larger than Taiwan.

“Today’s pledges by countries in Africa and Latin America to combat deforestation and more than double restoration targets will bring significant climate benefits,” said UN Under-Secretary-General and UNEP Executive Director, Achim Steiner. “At the same time, such inspiring initiatives will contribute significantly to poverty reduction, economic development and food security across countries and regions.”

reforestation and carbon capture

The Bonn Challenge will be extended through 2030 with a new goal of restoring 350 million hectares by that time–an area larger than India. The Bonn Challenge now has commitments to reforest about 55 million hectares of land.

“Restoration of degraded and deforested lands is not simply about planting trees. People and communities are at the heart of the restoration effort, which transforms barren or degraded areas of land into healthy, fertile working landscapes,” said Bianca Jagger, IUCN Ambassador for the Bonn Challenge.

Bianca Jagger Foundation and reforest Latin America

This weeks UN Summit was notable for a number of ambitious pledges on forests, including a partnership between Peru, Germany, and Norway to stem deforestation in the Amazonian nation; an agreement between Norway and Liberia to save forests in the latter; and a commitment to halve deforestation worldwide by 2020 and end it altogether by 2030.

Read more at http://news.mongabay.com/2014/0925-hance-bonn-challenge-un-summit.html#iIk4581xLjypDbWu.99

climate change and deforestation

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems. Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

Boy Scouts Complete Reforestation Project

Reforestation Project Spans 25 Years

The roots have been planted for a northwestern Nebraska reforestation program. Now, the project has been turned over to Mother Nature. About 1,400 members of the Boy Scouts of the Longs Peak Council and other volunteers planted 10,500 trees at Fort Robinson State Park on Saturday, the final chapter of an annual effort to reforest areas burned in a massive 1989 wildfire. The planting marked the 25th and final year for the event.

Nebraska reforestation

The planters were greeted with seasonably mild weather as they placed the ponderosa pine seedlings at points around the Spring Creek area on the north side of the park.

This year’s effort put the 25-year total number of trees planted over 450,000. Using common survival estimates for pine seedlings, the organizers believe at least 76,000 have lived, bringing some green back to the fire’s massive 48,000-acre burn scar.

The scouts and others paid tribute to the project’s history throughout the weekend. The annual planting event became more successful than any of its original organizers could have imagined. Beginning in 1990 with just 300-400 hundred scouts, it was originally scheduled to last just 5-10 years. But, the popularity of the event kept it going. About $175,000 in grants from the Nebraska Environmental Trust helped the program thrive.

Jim Schmitt of Dalton, a scout leader who organizes the effort, said the program has forged relationships and connected kids to nature. Not to mention, Fort Robinson has just been a fun place for them to be.

reforestation and carbon capture

“We never really knew why this thing took off like it did,” he said. “We know the Fort is part of the secret. Fort Robinson is a draw.”

Mike Morava, Fort Robinson State Park superintendent, said the project has not only provided outdoor education and conservation opportunities to thousands of youth, but it also has positively affected the landscape of the Pine Ridge with “a lasting legacy that will be enjoyed by visitors to the park for generations to come.”

Royden James of Torrington, his son Jonathan, and grandson Tyler, were given the honor of planting the project’s ceremonial final tree Saturday afternoon. The Jameses began coming to the tree plant when Jonathan was a boy, and continued into Tyler’s years as a Cub Scout and now a Boy Scout. The special tree was placed along Smiley Canyon near the pines planted during the first year.

“It’s great to be in that area and look at those trees again and think that we had a hand in helping get those trees, that are now 10 to 15 feet tall, in the ground,” Jonathan James said. “It’s great to see them established and replenishing the forest.”

All the fun isn’t over. Even though the tree planting is ending, Schmitt said the scouts of the Longs Peak Council will continue gathering at Fort Robinson annually in April. They will participate in other service projects around the park. Discussion also has begun about scouts helping plant trees at nearby Chadron State Park where wildfires struck in 2012.

Source: http://www.suntelegraph.com/story/2014/04/08/news/final-trees-planted-in-25-year-project-at-fort-robinson/3969.html

climate change and deforestation

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, carbon capture, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems.

Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

Reforestation In Fiji Funded By Germans

Sustaining Fiji’s Forests

Working with rural communities to educate and implement programs related to reforestation and reducing carbon emissions are some of the assistance provided by the German Agency for International Cooperation. Agency program director and senior adviser Dr. Wulf Killmann said the agency was working with Department of Forestry to ensure the industry’s social and environmental sustainability was viable for the future.

Fiji reforestation

“We have been involved in forestry and land use issues in the region for more than 25 years,” he said. “In 1988 we started our first project with the Fiji Forestry Department and we have been working here since then. We have been supporting the Fiji Government in a number of forestry issues, for example, the Fiji REDD Plus policy, we have supported the review of the Fiji Forest Decree, we are supporting the Fiji REDD Plus Committee and we have also been supporting the development of the Fiji Climate Change Strategy and Policy.”

Killmann said apart from working at the policy level with national leaders, the agency had also introduced its programs to a number of rural communities.

The REDD+, which denotes Reducing Emission from Deforestation and Forest Degradation, is a mechanism that is under negotiation at the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and Fiji has been part of this initiative since 2009.

“We are at the ground level. For example, there are three mataqali that we work with from the Yavusa of Emalu in Navosa Province. “We work with different communities on forestry issues particularly reducing emissions from degradation and deforestation.”

reforestation and carbon capture

The forest on Mataqali Emalu of Yavusa Emalu of the Navosa Province has been selected as a pilot site for the Fiji national REDD+ programme. The Mataqali land covers an area of 7, 347Ha covered predominantly by closed forest with multiple use function. There are also pockets of forests marked for protection due to sloping limitations and soil erodibility.

The forest area is largely untouched and is part of one of the few remaining primary indigenous forests in Fiji. The land is currently uninhabited with most members of the Mataqali Emalu residing in Draubuta village.

The Mataqali Emalu had expressed interest to undertake sustainable forest management (selective harvesting) in their forests. This is the “+ sustainable management of forests” under the UNFCCC REDD+ activity type. The given baseline scenario would be the conventional logging that would take place without this intervention. A forest management plan will be drawn up for the forest.

However, there are many implications in this regard. Given the isolation and lack of access into the area logging companies would have to invest highly to enter the forest. This drawback will be compounded by the decrease volume of timber extracted compared to that obtained through conventional logging. This option therefore, warrants further investigation in terms of feasibility for a logging company.

Another activity option proposed for the Emalu land is forest conservation. This is the “+ conservation of forest carbon stocks” in the UNFCCC REDD+ activity type. The baseline scenario is the conventional logging that has been proposed for the area and the threat from agriculture clearance. Forest conservation does not mean that the mataqali or yavusa members do not have access to the site but would mean that no commercial scale activity with regards to forest removal will take place. A land use plan to better manage activities within the forest will be developed.

He said the issue of forest sustainability involved three aspects which policy makers must always consider:

  • We have to look forward and there are three elements of sustainability and those are economics, social and environmental which are closely interlinked.
  • We have a tendency as human beings to look at the economic side of things.
  • Land use has quite a lot of impacts. We will not be able to have an economic viable future if we do not look at the social and environmental sustainability aspect of it as well.

The agency is also assisting government with similar projects in Labasa and Kadavu.

Source: http://www.fijitimes.com/story.aspx?id=268312&utm_source=REDD%2B+Digest+-+16+May%2C+2014&utm_campaign=REDD+digest+12-19-13&utm_medium=email

climate change and deforestation

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, carbon capture, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems.

Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

Reforestation Of UK A Necessity

Carbon Capture, Biodiversity, Resiliency

An industry group that represents 2,000 forest and wood-using businesses in the UK has called for new forestry grant schemes to support the planting of softwoods and hardwoods. It said it was vital that new forestry grants support targeted softwood planting and that opportunities are taken to ensure that broadleaved planting produces future supplies of quality wood.

Confor’s briefing to Owen Paterson and forestry minister Dan Rogerson came on the back of the publication of the first ever 50-year production forecast on softwoods and hardwoods, which Confor had been asking to be prepared for over two years.

reforestation and carbon capture

Caroline Harrison, Confor’s England manager, said: “The softwood forecast shows that wood availability will fall away in 30 to 40 years, threatening a successful, low-carbon industry which is displacing over £1bn of wood imports every year.

“In order to secure the future of this industry, it is vital that government support for new planting includes targeted support for planting softwoods. In northern England, for example, there is greater marginal land, and land-prices and CAP support are lower. Here, there is greater ability to deliver larger areas of woodland at lower cost, delivering carbon and biodiversity benefits, as well as securing local employment and business investment.”

Confor also reiterated the importance of controlling grey squirrels if England is to bring more of its woodlands back into beneficial management and to protect new planted woodland.

deforestation and climate change

She said: “Grey squirrel control should be a key feature of public support to the forestry sector, with grants providing for control of grey squirrels and government working with the private sector in a similar way it does with deer.”

Source: http://www.darlingtonandstocktontimes.co.uk/farming/11203291.Call_for_grants_on_growth_of_softwood_trees/

climate change and deforestation

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, carbon capture, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems.

Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

No Silver Bullets In Fight Against Climate Change

Hope Hinges On Forest Conservation, Reforestation

According to the experts and non-experts alike, climate change is now and it’s not an isolated event. There are no isolated solutions, which means that everyone must take accountability for their carbon footprint–and take action.

In the big picture, there are several ways to make an impact and minimize additional contributions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. There also are ways to help capture carbon from the atmosphere today. Here is a personal action plan (a starter list for now. More to follow).

Think about ways that you and your family, your neighbors and employers can pitch in on the following issues:

deforestation and climate change

1. Stop Deforestation. 

Deforestation is responsible for about 20 percent of the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. If left standing, those forests could help absorb the remaining CO2 in the atmosphere, so deforestation is a double-edged sword in the fight against climate change. Unfortunately, both edges work against us. Reuse paper bags. Buy recycled paper. Recycle paper. Don’t buy products that are over-packaged and tell those manufacturers to shape up. Don’t buy products that contain palm oil. Even most claims of sustainable palm oil have the blood of endangered species and deforestation on their hands.

2. Maximize Reforestation.

Support reforestation programs such as ours. Offset your carbon footprint, while minimizing it. Plants trees and shrubs near homes and buildings to help block the sun and wind, which also can help save energy. Help restore local watersheds to manage water supplies and to promote wildlife conservation and biodiversity. We need the web of life to survive this global event and the web of life needs our help to survive.

reforestation and climate change

3. Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy. 

Park your car. I did. Ride a bike. I am. Walk. Every day. Carpool. When possible. Use public transportation. Not necessary, but I will. Insulate your home from the elements. Turn thermostats up (AC) or down (heat) to save energy. Reduce. Reuse. Recycle. Unplug something (or several things). Go solar or something alternative. If your electric car is plugged into a coal-fired power plant, you haven’t helped the cause, yet. Get a solar charger.

sustainable cities and urban forestry

4. Greener Cities.

This is where the majority of people live. Cities are the problem and they are the solution. Demand action and accountability from yours. For more information, visit www.GreenerCities.org

5. Buy Local and Grow Your Own.

Just think about the energy that goes into your food supply and consumer goods. Everything that you grow, make, or buy local doesn’t have to be shipped by train, plane or truck. It also can save you money.

Bianca Jagger Foundation and reforest Latin America

6. Educate and Advocate.

Keep an open mind and learn as much as possible about climate change and sustainability as it relates to you, your country and the world. Share your knowledge and inspire others to take accountability and action. Teach your children and involve them now. They are inheriting this issue and must learn to deal with it as leaders and defenders.

7. Innovation. 

Innovation doesn’t have to be limited to technology. We just need to be smarter, more efficient and more creative. We also must develop more ways to be resilient in the face of a changing planet.

tanzania children and women

8. Cooperation.

Climate change is not an isolated problem and there will not be an isolated solution. The time for debate is over and the hope for a silver bullet is futile. Everyone is either part of the solution or part of the problem. I’m sure that you have an even broader list. Please keep the faith and keep hope alive. Once we give up, it will be chaos. If we delay, it will be impossible. One way to help immediate is to help us conserve and reforest thousands of acres across East Africa. It’s one of the largest projects of its kind in the world. We can’t do it without the help of foundations, corporations and donors. It’s ready to go today.

reforestation and climate change solution

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, carbon capture, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems.

Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com