African Elephant Census Paints Bleak Picture

The Push Toward Extinction Gaining Momentum

Results of a new survey reveal that Africa’s savannah elephants are going fast. The Great Elephant Census estimates that about 352,000 elephants remain—down from previous estimates of 419,000 to 650,000 elephants in 2013. The authors estimate that they recorded 93 percent of all savannah elephants. Elephants in Africa are threatened by poaching for their ivory, habitat loss and human encroachment and conflict.

elephant conservation Africa

“The statistics are frightening, and I hope they shock people out of their apathy so we can stem the tide,” said Mike Chase, founder of Elephants Without Borders, the group that oversaw the $7 million project.

A team that included 90 researchers from governments and conservation groups collectively flew 288,000 miles of aerial surveys — the equivalent of circling the globe almost a dozen times. They covered 18 countries, focusing on the national parks, refuges and range lands that are home to 93 percent of savanna elephants. Even in protected areas, researchers found many carcasses of elephants killed by poachers.

If the rate of decline continues at the current level of 8 percent per year, the continent will lose half its elephants within nine years and some populations could be wiped out, Chase said.

But the survey also uncovered some bright spots. Elephant numbers in Uganda more than quadrupled since the late 1980s. In Botswana, which is home to Africa’s largest elephant population, numbers held steady in many areas. And in a little-known park complex in Western Africa where the researchers expected to find perhaps 1,000 animals, they counted a thriving population of 9,000.

“The Great Elephant Census is an amazing feat of technology and science working together for wildlife — but these results are shocking,” said Tanya Sanerib, a senior attorney with the Center for Biological Diversity. “Elephant populations in Africa are declining at an alarming rate and more severely than we anticipated.”

Tanzania wildlife conservation

“The data now clearly show that if we don’t act immediately to stop poaching, close ivory markets and extend the strictest protections to elephants, we’ll lose these iconic creatures forever,” Sanerib continued.

The survey results do not include Namibia (which refused to release its survey results but is estimated to have more than 22,000 elephants, bringing the total to 375,000 elephants) or South Sudan and the Central African Republic, where surveys could not be completed due to armed conflict. The surveys were only conducted for savannah elephants and did not include forest elephants, a separate and smaller species inhabiting west and central Africa. Forest elephants could not be surveyed using the same aerial techniques due to the forested ecosystems they inhabit.

“Forest elephant populations are already known to be decreasing at alarming rates and now the Great Elephant Census has revealed that savannah elephants are in the same boat,” Sanerib concluded. “A world without elephants would be a very sad place and it’s time for international action on the ivory trade to make sure we never live in that world.”

forest elephants Arabuko Sokoke Kenya

Now, it’s up to individual nations and international regulators like CITES, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, to crack down on poaching and protect elephants, Chase said.

“The Great Elephant Census holds us to account,” he said. “We can no longer use ignorance about elephant numbers to avoid action.”

In addition to the threat from poachers, elephants and other endangered species are losing critical habitat to expanding human populations. The battle over land use and water will play an increasing role with every passing day.

Africa drought and wildlife conservation

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Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems. Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

Elephants Extremely Intelligent

Herds Have Extremely Tight Social Bonds

Aristotle held elephants in high regard. He said that they ‘surpass all others in wit and mind’. It was easy enough for him to understand that from what he saw. What we have discovered since his time has only served to reinforce that. Elephants are pretty amazing.

When we think of intelligent animals, we think of primates. It’s probably because we’re used to considering humans as the most intelligent, and so we think of the apes we came from as standing second. But we don’t take into account something called convergent evolution. To put very simply unlike the jargon of science, it indicates that different branches of evolution can reach similar destinations. That apes are smart enough to use tools and make monkeys out of us doesn’t mean that another branch of evolution – pachyderms – cannot also be just as smart. So are dolphins, of course, but elephants, unlike dolphins who kill porpoises for fun, are also kind.

elephant conservation Tanzania

Elephants Remember Everything

The saying about elephants’ memories is true. They do have excellently long memories. They don’t have the best eyesight, but they still don’t seem to forget a face. Take for instance what happened at The Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee when a new elephant named Shirley was being introduced. One particular girl named Jenny became very excited and could hardly be held back. But it wasn’t aggression – when they got to each other, it was very much like two very old friends meeting each other after a long time, trunks checking each other for scars and trumpeting. The puzzled observers dug into Shirley’s past and found out that 23 years ago, they’d been in the same circus. Not only did they remember each other, but they also had a bond that had not been broken by time.

The bond between Shirley and Jenny was not out of the ordinary. Elephants generally form matriarchal family units that are very closely knit. Every calf that is born is taken care of by the entire herd. Cynthia Moss, an ethologist whose specialisation is elephants, wrote in her book about an incident when poachers shot two elephants in a herd. One died; the other was wounded but standing. Two of the elephants in the family (the injured elephant’s mother and another) walked to the injured one and tried to hold her up. When she dropped to her knees, they tried to lift her up. The injured elephant died, but they still tried to help – the mother split her tusk trying to lift the lifeless body up.

When it was obvious that she was dead, they buried her in a shallow grave, covering her with leaves. They stayed with her through the night and eventually, in the morning, they moved on. Her mother was the very last to leave. Oh, and the poachers who shot the elephants were chased away by the rest of the family. Even the three musketeers could learn from this kind of togetherness.

elephant conservation plan Tanzania

Elephants Have Great Empathy

We’ve already talked about how elephants form deep bonds with each other that cannot be broken by time. They love each other and feel great grief and despair over the death of their family members, as has been observed from their behaviour and body language – they even weep over their dead. They also have burial rituals for their dead, just like we do.

But elephants’ compassion is not limited to their own species. They show great empathy and go out of their way to not hurt any animal or person. There have been documented instances where elephants have refused to obey commands that might mean hurting somebody – like refusing to put logs down if an animal would have been under it. There have also been instances where elephants have stayed with and cared for injured and isolated humans until they were found by people.

It is extremely rare for an elephant to attack anybody except during the time of musth for bull elephants, when they become extremely testosterone-driven and violent. Most other incidents of violence have been because the elephants have been repeatedly ill-treated by people, far beyond any human endurance levels. These incidents are usually damning proof of man’s evil, not elephants’ behavior.

elephant conservation Africa

As far as abstract expressionism is concerned, elephants might be doing a better job than people. There are star artists among captive elephants, one of the most famous of whom is Ruby. Ruby holds the brush with her trunk and is said to show a keen awareness of different colours and the sequence in which she wishes to apply them on canvas. Guided by trainers, elephants can often paint identifiable objects, as well. Elephants are also said to be able to recognize different melodies and music. Shanthi, another elephant, played the harmonica.

An elephant’s life and growth mirrors that of humans. Elephant calves need about the same amount of care, though they can walk much sooner than human babies can. They grow at about the same pace, becoming fully adult at about 20. Their natural lifespan is about 70 years, just like humans. Going by current evidence, we would say that they are capable of feeling more empathy than humans are – they have never tried to pluck pretty teeth from humans’ mouths and then left them to die, while humans seem determined to hunt elephants to extinction for their tusks. Who’re the real monsters here?

Source: http://www.theindianrepublic.com/quirky-corner/elephants-almost-human-100036992.html#sthash.MorJpFXL.dpuf

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Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, carbon capture, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems.

Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

Tanzania’s Elephant Herd Gone Within Five Years

Poachers Killing Tourism For Ivory

Poachers are slaughtering Tanzania’s elephants for their ivory at such alarming rates that the population could be completely wiped out in just seven years, conservationists told a conference Friday. The two-day UN-backed conference, which opened Friday, aims to develop strategies to stem elephant poaching in Tanzania, a top safari destination determined to protect its prized wildlife but struggling to stop sophisticated organized criminal gangs.

“Approximately 30 elephants a day are killed… at this rate the population will be exterminated by 2020,” said the Tanzanian Elephant Protection Society (TEPS), an independent conservation group.

African elephant poachers

Tanzanian Vice President Mohamed Gharib Bilal painted a bleak picture as he opened the summit, asking for international assistance in battling the increasingly well-organized and equipped poaching gangs.

“Organized and intricate poaching networks in and outside the country sustain this illegal trade, thus making it difficult for Tanzania alone to win this battle,” Bilal said.

Tanzanian police late last year launched a crackdown on suspected poachers amid a spate of elephant and rhino killings, operating under what was reported to be a shoot-to-kill policy and making sweeping arrests.

While poaching rates dropped drastically, the operation was shut down because of allegations of harassment, rape and murder of suspected poachers. At least 19 people were killed and over 1,000 arrested in the crackdown, according to a government investigation. Once it stopped, elephant killings soared again.

TEPS director Alfred Kikoti said he wanted the military to resume its role battling poachers.

“They have to stay in there, protecting our elephants,” he said. “They can’t just be in there for one operation and then pull out. It needs to be a longer term commitment.”

elephant conservation Tanzania

Poaching has risen sharply in Africa in recent years, with gangs targeting rhinos and massacring whole herds of elephants for their ivory. Organized gangs with insider knowledge and armed with automatic weapons and specialized equipment such as night vision goggles, use chainsaws to carve out the rhino horn or remove elephant tusks.

The growing trend is threatening Tanzania’s tourism sector, a key foreign currency earner for the country. The industry, nine tenths of which revolves around wildlife, accounts for 17 percent of Tanzania’s gross domestic product and employs over 300,000 people, according to official statistics.

Millions of dollars of elephant tusks and rhino horns are smuggled out of East Africa each year, according to the United Nations, with demand fuelled by an increasingly affluent Chinese middle class.

Tanzania’s vast Selous-Mikumi region was once home to one of the largest elephant populations in the world, with around 70,000 animals living there in 2006, Bilal said. Last year, that had plummeted to only 13,000 elephants.

The sale of ivory stockpiles — from tusks seized from poachers or recovered from animals that have died naturally — to raise funds for conservation created fierce debate at the conference.

illegal ivory trade and elephant extinction

International trade in ivory has been banned under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) since 1989. Tanzania’s current stock of 120 tonnes of ivory could — if sold at black market prices — raise over 60 million dollars (43 million euros), but conservationists argued it would only encourage more killings.

“A legal ivory market only stimulates an illegal ivory market,” said Trevor Jones, director of the Southern Tanzania Elephant Project.

“Moreover, an existing stockpile stimulates poaching, because it gives poachers hope that there may one day be a legal market, giving criminals a chance to launder their ivory.”

Source: http://www.interaksyon.com/article/86459/imagine–elephants-wiped-out-in-tanzania-by-2020-due-to-poaching

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Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, carbon capture, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems.

Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

Baby Elephants Orphans Of War On Wildlife

Poachers Shoot Young Or Leave Them To Starve To Death

Poachers have killed about 70,000 elephants across Africa over the past two years alone. The rate continues to rise, while the elephant population continues to decline. At this rate, the African elephant will be extinct in the wild within a decade. Poachers are killing pregnant mothers and young elephants, which is depriving the region of the next generation of elephants. Sometimes the young are the first to be shot because it freezes the entire herd. The few babies that survive the slaughter often starve to death by their dead mothers’ sides.

elephant conservation Tanzania

Born from one family’s passion for Kenya and its wilderness, the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust is today the most successful orphan-elephant rescue and rehabilitation program in the world and one of the pioneering conservation organizations for wildlife and habitat protection in East Africa.

Founded in 1977 by Dr. Dame Daphne Sheldrick D.B.E, in honour of the memory of her late husband, famous naturalist and founding Warden of Tsavo East National Park, David Leslie William Sheldrick MBE, the DSWT claims a rich and deeply rooted family history in wildlife and conservation.

At the heart of the DSWT’s conservation activities is the Orphans’ Project, which has achieved world-wide acclaim through its hugely successful elephant and rhino rescue and rehabilitation program. The Orphans’ Project exists to offer hope for the future of Kenya’s threatened elephant and rhino populations as they struggle against the threat of poaching for their ivory and horn, and the loss of habitat due to human population pressures and conflict, deforestation and drought.

To date the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust has successfully hand-raised over 150 infant elephants and has accomplished its long-term conservation priority by effectively reintegrating orphans back into the wild herds of Tsavo, claiming many healthy wild-born calves from former-orphaned elephants raised in our care.

Sheldrick Wildlife Trust

The DSWT has remained true to its principles and ideals, remaining a sustainable and flexible organisation. Guided by experienced and dedicated Trustees and assisted by an Advisory Committee of proactive naturalists with a lifetime of wildlife and environmental experience, the Trust takes effective action and achieves long-lasting results.

Chaired by Daphne Sheldrick, the DSWT is run by Angela Sheldrick, the daughter of David and Daphne, who has been managing all of the Trust’s activities for over a decade. Growing up in Tsavo and later in the Nairobi National Park, Angela has been part of the Trust’s vision from the start, supported by her husband Robert Carr-Hartley and their two boys Taru and Roan, who are passionate about Kenya’s wildlife and eager to ensure that David and Daphne’s legacy continues.

Source: http://www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org/about_us.asp

climate change and deforestation

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, carbon capture, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems.

Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

Restoring Elephant Migration Route Can Help Save Species, Ecosystem

Elephants Must Outrun Poachers, Climate Change

Nyeri County Governor Nderitu Gachagua yesterday announced a grand scheme to reconnect the former wildlife corridor between Mt. Kenya and the Aberdare mountains to allow in particular the elephant populations to resume their age-old movement patterns in search of pastures without constantly colliding with the population which has over the past decades moved into such corridors, leaving the routes fenced and fragmented at best and cut off altogether at worst.

elephant conservation Tanzania

The Aberdare National Park is already largely fenced in on the side of Nyeri and the Laikipia plains, in part to keep people out of the park and avoid encroachment but mostly to keep the animals inside and avoid elephants straying into the neighboring farms raiding crops.

The old migration routes, which connected Marsabit with the Laikipia plains and both Mt. Kenya and the Aberdares were similarly to the game access route from Amboseli, the Chyulu Hills over the open Athi plains into Nairobi National Park in recent decades turned into farms or ranchland, making migration very difficult and fears emerged of gene pool isolation of game populations literally trapped inside fenced areas with no access to the migration routes imprinted in their brains.

While the debate about restoring a corridor in and out of Nairobi National Park is ongoing, was the initiative of the Nyeri county governor meeting with instant approval by many of Kenya’s leading conservationists even though some doubted the assertion of the governor that a newly-established game corridor would provide tourists with regular sightings of migrating game similar to other migrations the governor had cited.

wildlife conservation and deforestation

Examples from conservancies like Ol Pejeta, which has left open small sections of their otherwise fenced sanctuary for elephant and other game to migrate in and out and which form the foundation of gaining the data and knowledge needed to establish a migration pattern, are now coming in handy as the Nyeri county government is setting out to engage with land owners in the proposed corridor with the aim to acquire tracts of land or persuade land owners to become voluntary participants, hopefully reaping benefits from tourism in years to come.

It was also learned from regular conservation sources in Nairobi that the Rhino Ark Trust Director, one Christian Lambrecht, has signaled the trust’s broad approval and participation in the scheme while expressing the hope that it would substantially reduce the human – wildlife conflict which presently exists, and has in recent years intensified to the detriment of the wildlife. This certainly is one project worth watching as the plans gain shape and progress is made towards the restoration of a migration route between Mt. Kenya and the Aberdares.

Source: http://www.eturbonews.com/43912/will-restoring-elephant-migration-route-restore-kenya-s-tourism

climate change and deforestation

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, carbon capture, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems.

Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

Elephants Have Warning Calls To Avoid Bees, Humans

Editor’s Note: Our partners in Kenya plan to use bees to keep elephants away from crops, which will save the lives of elephants and farmers. Please visit “East Africa Plan” on the menu bar above for more detail on how we are helping locals in East Africa save their ecosystem. 

Elephants Learning To Run From Poachers

When faced with danger, humans are likely to yell a specific alarm (for instance, “BEAR!”) while looking to get out of harm’s way. So, too, do elephants. And in research published late last month in Plos One, a team from Oxford University, Save the Elephants and Disney’s Animal Kingdom reveal elephants may have developed a specific alarm for “Human!”

forest elephants Arabuko Sokoke Kenya

By playing audio recordings of the Samburu, a tribe in northern Kenya, to African elephants in Kenya, researchers found the elephants went on alert and ran from the sound, all while emitting a “distinctive low rumble” (click here for audio).

The team then recorded that “rumble,” and played it to other elephants, who reacted similarly to the first group, as though humans were near.

“We concede the possibility that these alarm calls are simply a byproduct of elephants running away, that is, just an emotional response to the threat that other elephants pick up on,” one of the researchers, Dr. Lucy King, told Oxford University’s science blog. “On the other hand, we think it is also possible that the rumble alarms are akin to words in human language, and that elephants voluntarily and purposefully make those alarm calls to warn others about specific threats. Our research results here show that African elephant alarm calls can differentiate between two types of threat and reflect the level of urgency of that threat.”

In 2010, researchers discovered elephants also have a distinctive “bee alarm rumble”, which, when played, causes the animals to flee while shaking their heads, likely an attempt to kill the insects.

elephant conservation Tanzania

The unique responses to each different rumble has led scientists to postulate that elephants have more sophisticated verbal communication than previously realized.

“The acoustic analysis [of the rumbles] showed that the difference between the ‘bee alarm rumble’ and the ‘human alarm rumble’ is the same as a vowel-change in human language, which can change the meaning of words (think of ‘boo’ and ‘bee’),” Dr. King explained to the Oxford blog. “Elephants use similar vowel-like changes in their rumbles to differentiate the type of threat they experience, and so give specific warnings to other elephants who can decipher the sounds.”

African elephants are considered a “vulnerable” species as a result of poaching and a loss of habitat.

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/03/08/elephant-human-alarm-call_n_4921731.html

climate change and deforestation

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, carbon capture, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems.

Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

Elephant Census Begins In Kenya, Tanzania

Elephant Population Plummets

By Wolfgang H. Thome

An aerial elephant population survey is now underway in the trans-boundary ecosystem of Tsavo West National Park. The exercise has been supported by various stakeholders, including Daphne Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, International Fund for Animal Welfare, Monitoring of Illegal Killing of Elephants, Africa Elephant Fund, Save the Elephants and Tsavo Trust. A number of pilots have also volunteered to join the exercise conducted every two years, said KWS Corporate Communications Manager Paul Udoto.

The Tsavo elephant census usually covers Mkomazi in Tanzania, Tsavo West, Tsavo East and Chyullu Hills national parks, South Kitui National Reserve as well as the outlaying areas of Taita ranches and Mackinnon in Kwale.

wildlife conservation and deforestation

This survey also affirms the ongoing partnership between TANAPA (Tanzania Parks and Widlife) and KWS (Kenya Wildlife Services) when it comes to trans-boundary activities, which benefits both organizations and both countries.

The game count commenced yesterday and was officially launched at the Sarova Taita Hills Lodge. The survey is also expected to bring some new insights into the migration patterns of elephant in the area, which in recent years has seen a significant increase of human – wildlife conflict, compelling the Kenya Wildlife Service to fence sections of the Tsavo West National Park to keep the elephant in, though periodic breakouts by large groups of elephant continues to pose a problem when they then raid crops and have to be driven back into the park at considerable cost.

elephant conservation Tanzania

Elephants and Habitat Vanishing

Mr. Udoto said the census would seek to establish the population, trends and distribution of elephants as well as map out human activities inside and outside the protected areas. Policy makers “The results help policy makers and park management make sound decisions on resource allocation for security operations and conflict management,” he said yesterday. The Tsavo ecosystem census started in 2002 and is conducted every three years. In a statement, Udoto said previous aerial census in 2011 in the same area showed that the elephant population stood at 12,572 up from 11,696 recorded in the 2008 census. He said the census is a requirement of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES). Now there are some concerns, considering the poaching increase over the past three years, that the numbers may be rather different this time.

Source: http://www.standardmedia.co.ke/lifestyle/article/2000103302/kws-to-carry-out-census-of-elephants

climate change and deforestation

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, carbon capture, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems.

Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

Paul Allen Funds African Elephant Census

Elephants, Rhinos Outrunning Poachers, Drought

Paul Allen, one of the founders of Microsoft, has announced that he will be funding a survey on Africa’s elephants to calculate how many actually remain, where they are found, what threats they face and whether their total population numbers are in fact increasing or decreasing.

elephant conservation Africa

The Pan-African Survey was announced at an emergency summit on the illegal ivory trade which is being held in Gaborone this week. Together with the Clinton Foundation’s million dollar anti-poaching programs and President Obama’s decision to crush the illegal ivory stockpile in the US, Allen’s contribution reflects a world-wide concern for elephants.

Estimates of the number of African elephants left in the wild hover around the 500 000 mark, however with many areas left un-surveyed and elephant poaching happening at a rate of about one every 15 minutes, the survey will set right all assumptions and unofficial figures.

Botswana-based organization Elephants Without Borders will co-ordinate the survey, which will take place in thirteen countries in 2014. To complete this mammoth task they will require three fixed-wing planes and two helicopters and an estimated budget of US$8 million.

Tanzania wildlife conservation

Elephants Without Borders director Mike Chase had this to say about Allen’s contribution, “An eco-philanthropist like Paul knows what’s at stake and can identify with our vision because he visits Africa twice a year. He’s not a tourist. He talks to conservationists, biologists, villagers, staff and guides and he own lodges like Abu in the Okavango Delta. He and his sister, Jody, quietly fund so much conservation in Africa that isn’t generally known about. Their personal investment in the continent is amazing.”

forest elephants Arabuko Sokoke Kenya

Allen has expressed a concern for the future of Africa’s elephant population and using his family trust in an effort to protect them. “This is the bleakest time for the elephants,” said Allen, “The statistics on the plight of Africa’s elephants is daunting. I’m devoted to supporting new endeavors which provide meaningful science to help reverse this decline and to reduce the variability in elephant population statistics.”

Source: http://blog.africageographic.com/africa-geographic-blog/news/microsoft-billionaire-to-fund-elephant-survey/

elephant conservation Tanzania

climate change and deforestation

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, carbon capture, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems.

Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com