REDD+ Offers Hope In Battle Against Deforestation

Innovative Conservation Models Can Refine REDD+

In December 2015, with the signing of the Paris Agreement, the nations of the world reached agreement on a historic, collective and comprehensive approach to combat climate change. The primary goal of the agreement, under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), is to hold the increase in global average temperature to well below 2 degrees C above pre-industrial levels and try to limit the increase to 1.5 degrees C. Within that agreement is a recognition of the critical role of forests, including actions to halt and reverse the rate of deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries, which have contributed up to 20 percent of annual greenhouse gas emissions.

deforestation and global warming

To assist countries in these actions, the agreement includes a framework of policies and incentives for reducing deforestation and forest degradation and increasing carbon storage in forests through conservation and sustainable management. This is known as REDD+.

REDD+ has evolved over a decade of discussions, research and negotiations to become a key piece of the newly adopted climate architecture. It is flexible by design, as it recognizes the significant differences across countries in terms of societal and governance structures, histories, laws, economies, and ecological and environmental factors. It is intended to support the necessary economic transitions and shifts to sustainable landscape management as part of a country’s low carbon development. To ensure that it contributes to the environmental integrity of the climate regime, REDD+ requires a national commitment—not isolated projects. No more foundational decisions are needed for REDD+ to be fully implemented.

The adoption of the Paris Agreement in 2015 solidified the foundation for REDD+. The agreement referenced, in a single paragraph, the entire body of decisions, including the objectives, rules, guidelines and guiding principles for REDD+. The focus now is on actions to implement and support REDD+ initiatives. To do so, a solid understanding of REDD+ and the Paris Agreement is needed. We must understand what REDD+ is, in a manner that is accessible to policy makers, scientists and civil society and in a form that is completely consistent with the UNFCCC decisions and agreements.

The broad intent of REDD+ is to help countries shift to low-emissions development pathways by increasing the value of healthy forests relative to other land uses.

Greenhouse gas emissions are at an all-time high. If emissions are not reduced, it will be nearly impossible to hold global warming to below 2 degrees C. One of the best ways to address this challenge is to keep trees standing, as healthy forests are one of the largest store houses of carbon. And unhealthy forests—those that have been degraded or deforested—are the largest sources of greenhouse gas emissions, after the burning of fossil fuels.

reforestation and climate change

An approach called REDD+ is one of the most promising means for keeping trees standing in developing countries. “REDD” stands for “reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation.” The thought leaders behind REDD+ agreed that incentives are necessary not only to reduce emissions by tackling the drivers of forest loss, but also to avoid emissions and increase storage by taking proactive measures to conserve and restore forests.

The aim of REDD+ is to slowly halt and reverse forest cover and carbon loss in developing countries. The broad intent of REDD+ is to help countries shift to low-emissions development pathways by increasing the value of healthy forests relative to other land uses. Achieving and sustaining the objectives of REDD+ requires the transformation of economic activities within and outside of the forests, often referred to as the drivers of deforestation and forest degradation.

REDD+ was born in 2005 but its importance was not fully and formally recognized until December 2015, when the 197 parties to the UNFCCC adopted the Paris Agreement—a landmark global pact to curb climate change. Recognizing REDD+ in the Paris Agreement was seen as a means to highlight and validate the system of incentives for developing countries to conserve forests in the context of poverty reduction and economic development. It also filled a gap left by the Kyoto Protocol, which went into effect in 2005.

Prior to the Paris Agreement, the Kyoto Protocol was the main tool to achieve the objective of the UNFCCC–reducing greenhouse gas emissions and avoiding the worst impacts of climate change. However, the protocol did not include emissions caused by the unsustainable exploitation and destruction of forests in developing countries. With the Paris Agreement in place, REDD+ is now a key piece of the new climate architecture adopted by every country in the world. No additional foundational decisions are needed for REDD+ to be fully implemented. The focus now is on implementation and support of REDD+.

reforestation and carbon capture

REDD+ In A Nutshell

REDD+ is a voluntary approach for developing countries and includes five activities:

  •  Reduce emissions from deforestation;
  • Reduce emissions from forest degradation;
  • Conserve forest carbon stocks;
  • Sustainably manage forests; and
  • Enhance forest carbon stocks.

REDD+ includes four components:

  • A national strategy or action plan;
  • A national forest reference level as the basis for accounting the results of REDD+ activities;
  • A national forest monitoring system; and
  • A system for reporting how all of the REDD+ social and environmental safeguards are being addressed and respected throughout the implementation of the activities.

Countries implementing REDD+ pass three phases:

  • The development of national strategies or action plans, policies and measures, and capacity-building;
  • The implementation of national policies and measures, as well as national strategies or action plans, that could involve capacity building, technology development and transfer, and results based demonstration activities; and
  • Results-based actions that should be fully measured, reported and verified.

Financial support for REDD+ may come from a variety of sources, such as the public and private sectors and bilateral and multilateral agreements. This funding may include payments for emissions reductions achieved through the implementation of REDD+ activities. These are called results-based payments.

How are unintended negative social and environmental impacts avoided?

The 2010 Cancun Agreements established a set of seven social and environmental safeguards when implementing REDD+ activities, as well as guidance for systems to provide information on how countries are implementing the safeguards. Countries should start providing a summary of that safeguard information to the UNFCCC once they begin implementing REDD+ activities and periodically, thereafter.

deforestation Tanzania and Kenya

Doing so is a means for reducing or eliminating the potential negative impacts REDD+ could have on social and environmental values, beyond GHG emissions and associated climate change. The social safeguards promote and support good governance, respect for the knowledge and rights of indigenous people and members of local communities, and the full and effective participation of relevant stakeholders in the development and implementation of REDD+ activities. The environmental safeguards promote and support the conservation of natural forests and biological diversity. This helps ensure that REDD+ actions are not used for the conversion of natural forests, but are, instead, used to incentivize the protection and conservation of natural forests and their ecosystem services, as well as to enhance other social and environmental benefits.

The 2015 Paris Agreement highlights the role forests and other carbon stores (known as “sinks and reservoirs”) should play in meeting global and national climate change mitigation goals. In particular, Article 5 of the agreement highlights the role of forests in curbing climate change and effectively recognizes all of the existing guidance for REDD+ previously agreed to by the COP. This article states that all nations should take action to conserve and enhance the role of “sinks and reservoirs of greenhouse gases,” which include biomass, forests and oceans as well as other terrestrial, coastal and marine ecosystems.62 Nations are encouraged to take action to implement and support the existing REDD+ framework as set out in related guidance and decisions.63 This can be done in several ways, including through results-based payments. As specified in Article 4 of the Paris Agreement, REDD+ activities will also contribute to the goal of achieving a balance between anthropogenic emissions by sources and removals by sinks of greenhouse gases in the second half of this century.

climate change and deforestation

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, sustainable agriculture, carbon capture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems. Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com Together, we can stop deforestation and preserve biodiversity.

Deforestation A Crime Against Humanity

Deforestation Kills More Than Trees

By Arleen Richards, Epoch Times

Ensuring deforestation is given a proper place in global climate change discussions is an ongoing goal of the New York Declaration of Forests which was formalized at last year’s U.N. Climate Summit.

The Declaration—which codifies the willingness of 180 governments, companies, indigenous community networks and civil society organizations to halve natural forest loss by 2020 and end it by 2030—was a major accomplishment in 2014 and will be on the agenda again at this year’s U.N. Sustainable Development Summit on Sept. 25.

endangered species conservation and forest conservation

A panel discussion was held on Sept. 23 in preparation for those talks, to review the accomplishments over the last year towards achieving the goal of ending deforestation for commercial agriculture and developing more sustainable practices for the businesses that rely on land. The companies that signed on agreed to reduce the environmental and high carbon impact of several key commercial agricultural products such as palm oil, timber, cattle, and soy beans.

Deforestation is the second leading contributor to carbon emissions after the burning of fossil fuels, according to the Nature Conservancy, a conservation organization committed to land and water. Forests protect soil from erosion, produce oxygen, store carbon dioxide, and help control climate. When trees are cut down, the carbon dioxide is released into the air.

Referring to this week’s Development Summit, which has a broader focus than just climate issues, Eduardo Goncalves, International Communications Director for The Climate Group, talked about the importance of keeping forests on the agenda.

deforestation and climate change

“Climate really seems to be at the heart of the discussion and it’s absolutely right that forestry is a key element of that debate as well,” he said in opening remarks to kick off the panel.

More than 60 million hectares (about 232,000 square miles) of tropical forest have been converted to agriculture since 2000, according to Supply Change, which is tracking progress on the Declaration.

Panelists discussed the tremendous effort that has gone into getting the issue of deforestation on the climate agenda and the importance for the private sector to buy-in to the ambitions of the Declaration.

Stephen Donofrio, with Forest Trends’ Ecosystem Marketplace, in giving a progress report noted that just under 20 percent of the company endorsers are based in Southeast Asia; manufacturers and retailers who are receiving the most consumer scrutiny are mainly in North America; and food product sector makes up one-third of endorser companies.

Donofrio said that if a company is really committed to signing on it needs to incorporate that into its own corporate documentation, and in 92 percent of the companies they tracked, they are doing just that.

In order for the vision of the Declaration to work, Dominic Waughray, member of the executive committee of the World Economic Forum, praised the efforts of all participants, but noted that this is “a governmental issue” because as he said, they are the “stewards in the resource space.”

wildlife conservation and deforestation

He said governments have to change the way they think about forests. “The forest is a endowment which isn’t just an economic resource that can be turned into a product and sold somewhere else to make the economy work.” He urged governments to take a more long term approach and manage the natural resources in a sustainable way that would attract more and more investment and be very profitable for the poorest countries.

He sees the joint efforts of the declaration commitments as creating a leadership role for those countries that have a forest endowment to deliver on sustainable goals to their economies and create jobs for the people

“That’s the journey we’re going down with this. That’s the road to Paris,” he said referring to the World Climate Summit in December.

Climate Change and Deforestation News via http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/1767288-deforestation-should-be-at-heart-of-climate-discussion-says-ngo-panel/

climate change and deforestation

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, sustainable agriculture, carbon capture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems. Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

Tropical Deforestation Impacts Climate, Agriculture, Ecosystems

Impact As Costly As Carbon From Fossil Fuels

In the face of climate change, scientists often focus on the harmful effects of greenhouse gas emissions, but new research shows that tropical deforestation triggers global changes that are just as costly as carbon pollution.

Clearing trees not only releases carbon into the atmosphere, adding to the greenhouse gas effect, but also alters rain patterns and increases temperatures worldwide. This distorts Earth’s normal wind and water systems and puts future agricultural productivity at risk.

endangered species conservation and forest conservation

Tropical deforestation delivers a double whammy to the climate – and to farmers,” lead study author Deborah Lawrence said in a statement. “Most people know that climate change is a dangerous global problem, and that it’s caused by pumping carbon into the atmosphere. But it turns out that removing forests alters moisture and air flow, leading to changes – from fluctuating rainfall patterns to rises in temperatures – that are just as hazardous, and happen right away.”

Most people might think that this only impacts tropical places like South America, which is home to the expansive Amazon rainforest. However, researchers say that these findings even apply to the United Kingdom and Hawaii, which could see an increase in rainfall, while less rain would fall in the US Midwest and Southern France.

palm oil plantation deforestation

Overall, there would be 10-15 percent reduced rainfall in the region surrounding where the tree clearing took place. Thailand has already seen less rainfall at the start of its dry season, and the Amazon’s annual rainfall schedule has started to shift as well.

In addition, deforestation in South America, Southeast Asia and Africa may alter growing conditions in agricultural areas in the tropics and as far away as the US Midwest, Europe and China, which is bad news for farmers.

Complete tropical deforestation could lead to a rise in global temperature of 0.7 degrees Celsius (33.3 Fahrenheit), which is on top of the projected impact from greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide. According to the report, described in the journal Nature Climate Change, temperature increases are guaranteed with deforestation.

“This does not change, no matter what you do – no matter what kind of model you use, temperature increases occur – whether it’s half a degree, a full degree or two degrees,” Lawrence explained.

“That’s a very big deal,” she added. “In the last few centuries, the average global temperature has never varied by more than about one degree. Once we go above one degree – to 1.5 degrees or more – we’re talking about conditions that are very different from anything humanity has ever experienced.”

deforestation and climate change

Tropical forests move more water than any other ecosystem on land and are central to the Earth’s ability to generate moisture, helping to keep the planet cool. But removing large swaths of forests disturbs this natural cycle. What’s more, as more deforestation occurs, the greater its impact worldwide will be.

“While complete deforestation is unlikely to occur, over the course of history, deforestation has continued as countries develop,” Lawrence said. “Further, this study fills gaps in our understanding of deforestation tipping points – and what could happen if we continue down this path.”

According to the research, if 30-50 percent of the Amazon rainforest is cut down, it would put deforestation at the tipping point, meaning any more forest clearing than that would lead to rainfall reductions that could significantly change ecosystems, as well as raise the risk of forest fires.

Lawrence and her colleagues hope that this study can help policy makers and rainforest managers come up with better strategies for combating deforestation.

Source: http://www.natureworldnews.com/articles/11399/20141222/tropical-deforestation-triggers-changes-just-as-costly-as-carbon-pollution.htm

climate change and deforestation

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems. Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

Seeing Forests Through The Trees

New Paradigm On Forest Conservation

“FORESTS are the lungs of our land,” said Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Twenty years ago, the world’s lungs were diseased. Brazil, the country with more tropical trees than any other, was cutting down an area of forest two-thirds the size of Belgium every year. Roughly half of all the planet’s once-luxuriant tropical forests had been felled and the further degradation of the Earth’s green spaces seemed inevitable.

palm oil plantation deforestation

It would be too much to say that forests have made a full recovery. Worldwide, over 5m hectares of jungle—getting on for two Belgiums—are still being felled or burned down each year. In some countries, notably Indonesia, the chainsaws are growing louder. But the crisis is passing and the prognosis is starting to improve. Fears that the great forests of the Congo would be cleared have proved unfounded so far. Brazil and Mexico have reduced their deforestation rates by well over two-thirds. India and Costa Rica have done more than reduce the rate of loss: they are replanting areas that were once clear-cut.

Over time countries trace a “forest transition curve.” They start in poverty with the land covered in trees. As they get richer, they fell the forest and the curve plummets until it reaches a low point when people decide to protect whatever they have left. Then the curve rises as reforestation begins. At almost every point along the line, countries are now doing better: deforesters are chopping down less; foresters are replanting more.

illegal logging Romania

This matters to everyone, including rich countries in temperate zones, because of the extraordinary contribution that tropical forests make to mitigating carbon emissions. Trees are carbon sinks. If you fell and burn them, you release carbon into the atmosphere. If you let them grow, they squirrel carbon away in their trunks for centuries. Despite decades of destruction, tropical forests are still absorbing about a fifth of emissions from fossil fuels each year.

Encouraging countries to plant trees (or discouraging them from logging) is by far the most effective way of reducing greenhouse-gas emissions. If Brazil had kept on felling trees as rapidly as it was cutting them down in 2005, it would, by 2013, have put an extra 3.2 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. That means that over those eight years it managed to save six times as much carbon as ultra-green Germany did in the same period through one of the world’s most expensive renewable-energy regimes. As a way of helping the environment, protecting trees is hard to beat. It is in everyone’s interest to find out which forest policies work—and back them.

reforestation and carbon capture

As well as cleaner air, forests provide all sorts of benefits, such as clean water downstream. Alas, everyone is happy to enjoy the benefits but few are willing to pay for them. So the most effective forest policies are usually top-down bans, such as on farming or logging.

Prohibitions by themselves, though, are not enough. Tropical forests tend to be remote places where the writ of the law does not run. But Brazil shows that bans can be made to stick if there is political support at the top and popular backing from below (the policies started to bite when President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva took charge of them), and if there is an institutional network to back them up. In Brazil’s case, that meant everything from satellites to show the public what was happening in the Amazon to moratoriums on purchases of soy beans and beef produced on cleared land.

Only forested countries themselves can provide leadership from the top. But outsiders can help. They could finance, say, new land registries. And they should fund an all-purpose UN programme to improve forest management in tropical countries called REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation).

Rich countries spend billions on renewable energy at home, which has so far cut carbon emissions only a bit. They should be willing to spend a few millions abroad, protecting tropical forests that reduce emissions a lot.

Source: http://www.economist.com/news/leaders/21613262-saving-trees-one-best-ways-saving-environment-seeing-wood?zid=313&ah=fe2aac0b11adef572d67aed9273b6e55

climate change and deforestation

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, carbon capture, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems. 

Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

Need New Paradigm For Forest Conservation

Deforestation Destabilizing Planet

The number of major corporations making commitments to purchase certified “deforestation-free” commodities steadily has increased over the past 18 months. Kellogg’s and McDonald’s are just two recent examples of companies that have made such commitments. But will certification policies alone be enough to reduce deforestation, or should governments and corporations consider other strategies that provide incentives for forest conservation?

deforestation and climate change

Global deforestation is linked to a number of key environmental and social concerns including global climate change, the extinction of species and the rights and well-being of 1.6 billion vulnerable people that depend on the forest for their livelihoods. As market linkages to deforestation have become better understood, companies are examining their supply chains and beginning to shift purchases to certified commodities.

A big unknown for these companies is whether their commitments can stimulate an adequate supply of certified sustainable commodities to meet their needs at a reasonable price. Based on data collected by WWF, certified sustainable commodities make up somewhere between two percent and 15 percent of the total global supply of the four largest forest risk commodities: cattle, palm oil, soy and timber.

A key challenge in increasing the supply of certified commodities will be compensating growers and producers for the costs of sustainable production including certification costs, the costs of changing management practices and maybe most important, the opportunity costs of foregone production on forested land.

endangered species conservation and forest conservation

One way to compensate growers and producers is through higher prices, although in practice, companies and customers have been reluctant to pay price premiums for certified commodities. Data recently released by GreenPalm showed that certified palm oil generated only a minor 1.2 percent price premium over conventional palm oil in 2013. And while there are examples of modest price premiums for certified timber, these premiums have not been sufficient to expand the supply of FSC certified timber beyond 10 percent of total global timber supply.

Another way to compensate growers and producers for better practices is through incentive-based payments linked to forest protection. This is TerraCarbon’s approach. Payments for generating carbon offsets are one such incentive that have been developed to compensate forest landowners for the climate value of keeping their forests standing. Used with commitments to purchase certified commodities, offsets can help provide the funding needed to increase the supply of sustainable commodities and to protect forests.

Two recent initiatives support the notion of combining commodity certification and offsets. The Carbon Canopy program, launched by Dogwood Alliance in partnership with large corporations such as Coca-Cola, Domtar and Staples seeks to increase the supply and demand for certified timber and carbon offsets produced from forests in the southeast U.S. that practice sustainable forestry.

palm oil kills orangutans

The second initiative is the Sustainable Forests Landscapes announced at last year’s UN climate conference by the World Bank BioCarbon Fund. The U.S., U.K., German and Norwegian governments have pledged $280 million for this initiative to provide results-based incentives for activities that reduce deforestation. Unilever and Mondelez have stated their support (PDF) for this initiative, and will be working with the BioCarbon Fund to see how the initiative can support their certified commodity sourcing strategies.

Initiatives such as these can be replicated elsewhere by private companies working together and with governments. Funding for incentives will remain a key question that can be answered in the long-term by regulations that put a price on carbon, and in the short-term by voluntary offset purchases by companies taking action on climate change and deforestation.

Corporate commitments to purchase certified commodities should be applauded as important steps in the fight against deforestation. Greenwashing, however, should not be tolerated.

At the same time, if the aim is to reduce deforestation not only at a supply chain scale, but also at regional and global scales, then governments and corporations need to go further and provide economic incentives, such as payments for carbon offsets, that generate alternative income and keep forests standing.

Source: http://www.greenbiz.com/blog/2014/05/13/how-reduce-deforestation-its-not-one-cut-and-dried-solution

climate change and deforestation

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, carbon capture, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems.

Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

Deforestation Contributing To Climate Change

East Africa Prepared To Conserve Forests, Reforest Degraded Land

When it comes to climate change, much of the conversation is limited to energy policies. Meanwhile, wholesale deforestation is releasing staggering amounts of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere every day, while eliminating nature’s ability to absorb carbon dioxide from the air.

Deforestation impacts climate change in two ways. First, it’s estimated that deforestation is responsible for 20 percent of the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Secondly, healthy forests can capture several tons of CO2 per acre from the atmosphere every year. Deforestation eliminates that capacity from our ecosystem, which is half the reason we’re treading water today in many regions of the world and drying up in others.

wildlife conservation and deforestation

Of course, these forests also are critical to the survival of endangered species and endangered communities. Thanks to deforestation, orangutans, tigers, elephants and many other endangered species are at critical levels and their habitats (our shared resources) are still under siege.

The forests in East Africa represent one of the largest stands of tropical forest left in the world. Unfortunately, Tanzania’s forests are vanishing faster than most tropical forests, which makes it even more important to seize the opportunity to conserve them. Villagers cut them for firewood, while the effects of drought cut deeper and deeper each year. We can stop the destruction and reverse it with a regional reforestation and economic development project that will create hundreds of jobs and help protect wildlife.

Some visionary young leaders in East Africa have developed comprehensive plans to help their communities, their countries and the world fight climate change. They will promote sustainability for their cultures and endangered species, including elephants, rhinos, mountain gorillas and more.

Africa wildlife conservation

The scope already involves six projects, dozens of NGOs, the United Republic of Tanzania and thousands of stakeholders across five nations, including Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda. The projects include more than 200 million acres of existing forests that will be permanently protected. Stakeholders also will plant more than 100 million new trees. In addition , the project will include agroforestry, biochar, beekeeping and support for sustainable agriculture.

We can’t afford to lose another acre of woodlands or waste another day on political gridlock regarding energy policy. We have a rare, shovel-ready opportunity to shape the future of Africa and the world. The sooner that we can seize it, the sooner that it can start paying dividends. There are fewer forest conservation and reforestation projects on the planet that can make a difference on this scale this fast.

Please help us contact stakeholders who can fund this important program. We need grants, sponsorships, donations and carbon offset revenue to make this a reality. We can shower our sponsors with as much recognition as they can tolerate as this will become a global showcase for years and years. We can channel the forest conservation efforts as necessary to meet regulatory requirements for carbon offset credit.

reforestation and climate change solution

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, carbon capture, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems.

Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

Sustainability Author, Advocate Promoting Forest Conservation

Mother Nature Calling For Help

Deforestation is out of control. Forests are going at the speed of light and so are the plants and animals that live within them.

A public relations and public affairs firm from the United States (Denver, New York and Phoenix) has offered to be the hired gun for the voiceless and their advocates.

Africa wildlife conservation

Crossbow Communications is an award-winning firm that has worked with leading journalists around the world to help shift public opinion and public policy. In fact, the company’s founder, Gary R. Chandler, convinced news legend Mike Wallace to help with an award-winning campaign. He also has recruited top athletes, including members of the Denver Broncos, to help with cause-related efforts.

Chandler hopes to do the same for endangered species and sustainability causes. His company also has started an innovative, yet simple program called Sacred Seedlings. The intent is to promote forest conservation, reforestation and urban forestry.

Tanzania and Kenya wildlife conservation

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems. Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support.

PR firm climate change and forest conservation

Crossbow Communications specializes in public affairs, issue management and marketing strategy. The strategists have influenced public opinion and public policy around the globe. http://crossbowcommunications.com/public-affairs-firm-phoenix/