China Reforestation Becoming A Global Model

Economic Growth Has Taken Its Toll On China’s Natural Resources

The Chinese government has payed close attention to ecological and environmental issues for years. Contrary to popular belief, sustainability and environmental protection are long-term strategies vital to the country’s health and wealth.

climate change and deforestation

China started framing environmental protection as a fundamental national policy in the 1980s. It established sustainable development as a national strategy in the 1990s. At the turn of the century, the government proposed a “Scientific Outlook on Development” that is people-centered, fully coordinated, and environmentally sustainable. Since 2012, the government has incorporated Eco-civilization into the national blueprint, which outlines a commitment to “innovative, coordinated, green, open and shared development.”

This blueprint has given great impetus to the implementation of Eco-civilization with environmental quality at its core aiming at making the skies bluer, mountains greener, water cleaner, and the ecological environment better.

President Xi Jinping has pointed out that green is gold and that moving towards a new era of eco-civilization and building a beautiful China are key to realizing the Chinese Dream of rejuvenating the nation.

Since its reform and opening-up thirty years ago, the country has seen its economy grow at an annual average of 9.8 percent. It has successfully transitioned from a low-income to a high middle-income country with significant economic achievements, almost having reached levels of industrialization and urbanization that took one to two hundred years in developed countries.

Meanwhile, China has paid a heavy environmental price, with the emergence of problems such as soot pollution, ozone depletion, fine particulate matters (PM2.5), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Pollution from different sources – production and households, urban and rural, industry and transport – appear to be intertwined with each other.

China deforestation

For years China was notorious for denuding its forests of vegetation to expand its economy. The economy grew, but water sources were tainted, air polluted and animal habitats demolished. Only a few years ago, just two percent of China’s forests were undisturbed. Deadly floods in 1998 caused by the lack of trees prompted the government to finally take action. They implemented the National Forest Conservation Program.

China banned logging in many areas and then paid farmers, who were accustomed to earning money by cutting down trees for wood, to plant trees instead. Some local citizens were paid to monitor forests and report illegal logging activity. The Chinese government claims that the conservation and reforestation plans are working.

Scientists from the University of Michigan evaluated the Chinese government’s conservation measures using images from NASA’s Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer. They studied data between 2000 and 2010 and found forest cover has grown rapidly in 1.6 percent of China. That may not sound like much, but it’s about 61,000 square miles. Meanwhile. 0.38 percent of the nation suffered from deforestation – that’s around 14,400 square miles.

deforestation China

The research isn’t simply a green light for China to continue every current policy. They’re importing more wood now, from countries such as Vietnam, Madagascar, and Russia, which the scientists warned causes deforestation in those other countries.

China plans to cover nearly a quarter of the country in forest by 2020, according to an announcement made via a United Nations report. The goal is part of a larger plan to build an ecological civilization that will serve as a model for future projects around the world.

“The outdated view that man can conquer nature and ignore the bearing capacity of resources and the environment should be completely abandoned,” said Zhu Guangyao, executive vice president of the Chinese Ecological Civilization Research and Promotion Association. “Conscientious efforts should be made to live in harmony with nature.”

giant panda conservation

In addition to planting, the country will also step up efforts to restore 35 percent of the natural shorelines, reclaim more than half of the desert, and increase prairie vegetation coverage by 56 percent.

“If China succeeds in implementing targets outlined in its ecological blue print, then it will have taken a major step towards shifting to a greener economy,” Achim Steiner, UNEP executive director, said.

To address the dilemmas between economic development and resource/environmental constraints, the government has most recently proposed a policy of pursuing green development and building an Eco-civilization, which involves management of the relationship between humans and nature in a comprehensive, scientific, and systematic manner. It embodies the green is gold perspective of values, development, and governance. It goes beyond and does away with the traditional development patterns and models, guiding the transformation of the production methods and the lifestyle of the entire society.

As China firmly supports and actively implements the concept and actions of sustainable development at the global level, its effort to build an Eco-civilization will make a significant contribution to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The country’s practices and experiments to promote an Eco-civilization will not only contribute to addressing its own resource and environmental challenges but also serve as demonstrations for other developing countries that may wish to avoid the dependence on, and the lock-in effect of traditional development pathways. This is conducive to promoting the establishment of a new global environmental governance system and benefitting the noble course of sustainable development for all people, men and women.

Reforestation China via http://reliefweb.int/report/china/green-gold-strategy-and-actions-china-s-ecological-civilization

climate change and deforestation

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems. Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

Carbon Capture Project Ready Today

Capturing Carbon Dioxide With Forests

Forests are Mother Nature’s way of capturing carbon and turning it into a productive use. They also hold the majority of biodiversity that we depend on for a healthy ecosystem and they often are the anchors and macro filters of our watersheds.

We must do what we can to stop deforestation and we need to proceed with reforestation and afforestation as much as possible. It’s one of the few things that people can do individually and collectively to pull harmful Co2 from the atmosphere today. Idealists talk about a technological solution, but I wouldn’t hold your breath.

deforestation Tanzania and Kenya

These forests below (as seen from satellite) in Tanzania are some of the largest tracts left in Africa. The world can’t afford to lose any more of these, or any, forests. We have a way to save them and reforest them right now.

Deforestation A Big Part Of The Climate Problem

Deforestation impacts us all and it’s responsible for almost half of the global warming problem, when you consider the carbon released and the carbon capture capacity lost. A healthy forest consumes carbon dioxide from the air, so burning them is a double-edged sword in the fight against climate change. We have destroyed the earth’s capacity to absorb carbon on land. Oceans are already more acidic from absorbing more carbon, which means they are reaching capacity. As a result, carbon dioxide is building up in the atmosphere to record levels.

reforest Tanzania

Forests are important. They are here for a reason. Our Tanzania Projects will make a difference on many levels. We are ready to conserve and reforest thousands of acres in Tanzania today. We also have smaller projects ready to go in Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda and Uganda. This is one of the largest carbon capture projects in the world today.

wildlife conservation and deforestation

We are hot on the trail of foundations, corporations and donors who are willing to invest in this rare opportunity to save vanishing rain forests and endangered species on a grand scale. We don’t have time to waste, so please help us network to find them. Please write to me gary@crossbow1.com with any leads or resources that you can offer us in this important cause. Thank you.

reforestation and climate change solution

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, carbon capture, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems.

Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

Coalition Working To Save Kilimanjaro Ecosystem

Fighting Climate Change, Defending Ecosystems

Mother Nature is showing her wear and tear. Climate change, pollution, deforestation, endangered species and poverty are getting worse by the day and they impact the sustainability of life as we know it.

Fortunately, a massive conservation plan in East Africa is ready to make a lasting impact on all of these issues at once. The model is replicable and scalable for countries and communities around the world. The key is to get as many trees in the ground as possible—as soon as possible (visit “Africa Plan” on the menu bar above for more detail).

deforestation Tanzania and Kenya

The program, Sacred Seedlings, aims to fight climate change, wildlife poaching, loss of wildlife habitat, and poverty around the world. Under the guidance of local NGOs and government, five massive projects are ready to begin immediately in Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda.

In honor of the first ever World Wildlife Day, Crossbow Communications announced that it will donate all new client revenue in 2014 to help fund this plan to save the vanishing ecosystems of East Africa. Crossbow, a global public affairs company, hopes that it’s commitment will attract new clients from around the world, especially those devoted to sustainability and wildlife conservation.  Crossbow also is contacting foundations and corporate sponsors to help fund the sustainability projects.

reforest Tanzania

Planting 10 Million Trees In Tanzania

“I’m not aware of any other company in the world that is donating all profits to wildlife and forest conservation,” said Gary Chandler, founder of Crossbow and cofounder of Sacred Seedlings. “We challenge other companies to join us as clients or donors and we will shine a very bright light on those leaders to maximize their return on investment.”

Several NGOs in Kenya and Tanzania have developed the conservation and reforestation plans, which also include sustainable agriculture, community education and engagement and more. The NGOs approached Chandler, a renowned wildlife conservationist and author, in search of solutions to the wildlife poaching crisis in East Africa, where elephants, rhinos and other species could be pushed into extinction within 10 years by poachers. The cornerstone of the effort is a massive reforestation program that will plant more than 100 million trees. These trees will absorb massive amounts of carbon from the atmosphere, which can help us mitigate the build-up of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, which contribute to climate change and extreme weather around the world. The reforestation effort also will help preserve biodiversity and habitat for wildlife.

lion conservation Africa

The reforestation will help create hundreds of jobs, which will take away some of the economic imperative that drives wildlife poaching and the multi-billion dollar illegal wildlife trafficking industry. Last year, more than 35,000 elephants and more than 1,000 rhinos were killed by poachers across Africa. Unfortunately, poachers aren’t the only threat to the survival of many endangered species. Drought and loss of habitat also could push them into extinction.

“We’ve had the Sacred Seedlings model in development for about four years,” Chandler said. “When our new partners in Africa contacted us for help, they eagerly embraced the business model as one that could save the vanishing wildlife, ecosystems and cultures of the region. Now, the interest from stakeholders is snowballing around the world. It’s time to get them funded to maximize the impact of the opportunity, so we’re putting our money where our heart is–the future.”

Africa wildlife conservation

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems. Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support.

Chandler hopes to raise more than one million dollars for the effort from his company’s donations. That will fund the Kilimanjaro project, but four other programs will require a greater investment. He hopes that other corporate leaders will sponsor much of the program, while foundations also are expected to play a leading role.

climate change and deforestation

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, carbon capture, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems.

Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

Carbon Capture With Reforestation

Reforestation The Only Proven Carbon Capture Option Available

Editor’s Note: A solid premise, but the best way to suck carbon dioxide from the atmosphere is with trees and other forms of greenery. 

Governments may have to extract vast amounts of greenhouse gases from the air by 2100 to achieve a target for limiting global warming, backed by trillion-dollar shifts towards clean energy, a draft U.N. report showed on Wednesday. A 29-page summary for policymakers, seen by Reuters, says most scenarios show that rising carbon emissions will have to plunge by 40 to 70 percent between 2010 and 2050 to give us a chance of restricting global warming to U.N. targets.

reforestation and forest conservation

The report, outlining solutions to climate change, is due to be published in Germany in April after editing by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). It will be the third in a series by the IPCC, updating science from 2007.

It says the world is doing too little to achieve a goal agreed in 2010 of limiting warming to below 2 degrees above pre-industrial times, seen as a threshold for dangerous floods, heatwaves, droughts and rising sea levels. To get on track, governments may have to turn ever more to technologies for carbon dioxide removal (CDR) from the air, ranging from capturing and burying emissions from coal-fired power plants to planting more forests that use carbon to grow.

Most projects for capturing carbon dioxide from power plants are experimental. Among big projects, Saskatchewan Power in Canada is overhauling its Boundary Dam power plant to capture a million tonnes of carbon dioxide a year. 

And, if the world overshoots concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere consistent with the 2C goal, most scenarios for getting back on track “deploy CDR technologies to an extent that net global carbon dioxide emissions become negative” before 2100, it says.

Temperatures have already risen by 0.8C since the Industrial Revolution. To limit warming, the report estimates the world would have to invest an extra $US147 billion ($164 billion) a year in low-carbon energies, such as wind, solar or nuclear power from 2010 to 2029. At the same time, investments in fossil fuel energy would have to be reduced by $US30 billion annually. And several hundred billion dollars a year would have to go on energy efficiency in major sectors such as transport, buildings and industry.

deforestation and global warming

By contrast, it said that global annual investments in the energy system are now about $US1.2 trillion. And it says there are huge opportunities for cleaning up, for instance by building cities that use less energy for a rising world population. “Most of the world’s urban areas have yet to be constructed,” it says.

Overall, the report estimates that the costs of combating global warming would reduce global consumption of goods and services by between 1 and 4 percent in 2030, 2-6 percent in 2050 and 2-12 percent in 2100, compared to no action.

The IPCC said in September that it is at least 95 percent probable that human activities, led by the burning of fossil fuels, are the dominant cause of global warming since the 1950s, up from 90 percent in a 2007 assessment.

The world has agreed to work out a global U.N. deal by the end of 2015, entering into force from 2020, to fight climate change. But progress has been sluggish.

deforestation Tanzania and Kenya

“Global greenhouse gases have risen more rapidly between 2000 and 2010,” the draft says, with greater reliance on coal than in previous decades. China, the United States and the European Union are the top emitters.

The IPCC cautioned that the findings in the draft, dated Dec. 17, were subject to change. “This is a work in progress which will be discussed and revised in April,” said Jonathan Lynn, spokesman for the IPCC in Geneva.

The report adds many details to earlier drafts. The IPCC’s credibility suffered in 2007 after one of its reports wrongly said that Himalayan glaciers could all melt by 2035, centuries earlier than experts reckon. The draft says that only the most radical curbs outlined in an IPCC report in September would give a better than 66 percent chance of keeping temperature rises below 2C. The scenario corresponds to greenhouse gas concentrations of 430 to 480 parts per million in the atmosphere – up from about 400 now.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/environment/climate-change/sucking-co2-from-atmosphere-may-be-only-way-to-meet-climate-goals-un-report-says-20140116-30vnr.html#ixzz2qVdwqVwr

climate change and deforestation

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, carbon capture, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems.

Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

Reforestation Fights Climate Change

Forests Capture Large Volumes Of Carbon Dioxide

The redwood forests have long represented Continental America, dominating the northwest coastal region with some of the world’s tallest trees resiliently living up to 2,000 years. However, America’s famous forests are not as grand as they once were. According to data from the U.S. National Park Service, “96 percent of the original old-growth coast redwoods have been forested.”

As Euro-Americans expanded westward in the 1800s due to the gold rush, the durability and availability of Redwoods proved ideal for settlers establishing a new population. Sawmills flourished, and Redwoods were excessively felled. Land fraud, in which public domain redwood forests were transferred to private industry, led to the severe decrease in the redwood population.

Tanzania and Kenya wildlife conservation

The Timber and Stone Act of 1878 permitted the sale of up to 160 acres of federal land for $2.50 per acre. The law was initially created to designate land to settlers. However, fraudulence spread as land purchased by settlers was quickly sold to lumbering industries, and hundreds of acres meant for individuals was transferred to corporate ownership. U.S. Senator John H. Mitchell, along with Representative Binger Hermann were accused of assisting and accepting money from “land grabbers” that used aliases to purchase more than the 160 acres, assuming multiple homestead allotments.

As homesteads were established, and corporations obtained hundreds of acres for logging, the unbounded redwood forests waned. By the early 1900s, most of the forests were gone. A mere 4 percent of the original forests survive today.

Yet these enormous trees are some of the longest-living, most efficient trees in the world, sequestering up to 400 tons of carbon dioxide at maturity and in the process of storing CO2 release oxygen into the atmosphere.

David Milarch, co-founder of the Archangel Ancient Tree Archive is determined to save the redwoods, and in the process, reduce the effects of greenhouse gases, ultimately with the hope of halting global warming. Archangel’s mission is to “propagate the world’s most important old growth trees before they are gone.

Reforest the Earth with the offspring of these trees to benefit all life through the natural filtering process of the trees to increase oxygen, sequester carbon dioxide, and provide beneficial aerosols and medicines. Archive the genetics of ancient trees in living libraries around the world for the future.” The Milarch father-son team of Michigan nurserymen and a plant propagator from California are harvesting old-growth DNA, propagating the seedlings in hormone-enriched soil, and planting them up the Northwest coast of Continental America to assist in migration and to slow the effects of global warming.

old growth trees

One of the biggest questions concerning Archangel’s mission to propagate and reforest is “why use old-growth trees?” Naturally, cloning younger DNA is significantly easier than ancient DNA. However, Archangel is convinced that old-growth trees possess something unique that will help them in reforestation efforts. Milarch posits that while there is really no current evidence to support using old-growth trees for propagation, these trees have mysteriously survived longer than average Redwoods. “Most Redwoods don’t grow more than 1,000 years,” says Milarch, “but the small fraction of old-growth trees have lived between 2,000 and 3,000 years.” While the reason for this hasn’t yet been discovered, the newly planted old-growth clones are expected to make a difference.

A study at University Pennsylvania established that the average street tree lives between 7 to 30 years, while suburban residential trees survive anywhere from 30 to 150 years. Because Redwoods live significantly longer than the average street or residential trees at up to 2,000 years, they have the potential to sequester huge amounts of carbon dioxide, which could radically slow or stop global warming. After 2 or 3 years, Milarch expects the trees to grow about 10 feet annually, so even at their smallest size, they will be making a difference. While the size of Redwoods is what appears to make them desirable, it is their ability to grow quickly which makes them an ideal tree for CO2 reduction, as young, fast-growing trees generally sequester carbon dioxide most rapidly. Once the Redwoods reach maturity, Milarch explains that each tree stores 400 tons of carbon, which is “a hell of a lot better than the street trees we’re planting in our path of urbanization.”

reforestation and forest conservation

Trees A Growth Industry

On December 14, Archangel Ancient Tree Archive led the planting of a “champion redwood and sequoia forest” in Port Orford, Oregon using genetic clones of old-growth trees, such as the ancient Fieldbrook Redwood. Champion redwoods generally have a combination of significant height, diameter and crown spread, implying a zealous hardiness.

The old-growth trees, or champion redwoods, which have survived approximately 2,000 to 3,000 years are suspected to be genetically superior. The forest planted with the presumed superior trees is not only an effort to archive ancient tree genetics, but also assists in the migration of redwoods which are threatened by climate change. Climate models predict that global ecosystems will shift poleward as global temperatures rise, suggesting that the habitat in which redwood trees thrive will migrate farther north each year.

Accordingly, these climate models suggest that the redwoods need to migrate approximately 700 kilometers within 70 years in order to maintain a comfortable environmental zone, one which provides enough moisture and temperate climate to survive. However, Dr. Sally Aitken from University of British Columbia recently told The Globe and Mail that, without assistance, these trees, “can only shift their range at about 100 meters a year,” based on ice age studies. At the projected rate, the trees would never make it far enough north to survive rising global temperatures, thus requiring migration assistance.

As Milarch and his team members move the trees farther north, Archangel’s sights are set beyond North America. Milarch says that for global redwood reforestation, they’ve established, “eight countries they will do well in,” which includes France, Ireland, Chile, Wales and the province of British Colombia. Despite having a narrow climate niche, redwoods have been planted outside of the United States with success in Australia and New Zealand and parts of Europe. Sierra Redwoods have thrived in the Black Forest in Germany, as well as the British Isle, as they benefit from an environment with high rainfall and humidity. Costal Redwoods have been grown in South America and throughout Europe. Both types of Redwoods are planted in an ornamental capacity. However, the Costal Redwoods that have been used for reforestation efforts in global locations have yielded few successes.

Milarch, however, insists that some of the planned countries offer even better environments for the Redwoods than their native coastal America habitat, noting that, “Ireland is especially good for them.”

Some scientists have expressed concerns that even moving the Redwoods farther north in the U.S. could be detrimental to their growth. Black bears in the area rip the bark from redwoods, feeding on the soft cambial layer. Furthermore, reports question if Port Orford, Oregon is too cold for the Redwoods, which require warm, humid environments with temperatures between 15° and 100° Fahrenheit. While some claim that cooler Oregon will inhibit Redwood growth, the average low annual temperature in Port Orford is 45.5° Fahrenheit. Archangel is optimistic that the trees will thrive in their new environment, as California’s temperature has rapidly increased and a sharp decline in rainfall threatens the trees, which require fog and humidity.

However, Milarch argues, “we’ve got larger fish to fry than a few bears roaming around,” and that Port Orford’s cool, damp environment “fit the trees to a T.”

While Archangel hopes to reach their eight-country reforestation goal within two to three years, concerns are raised that the introduction of American Redwoods could devastate non-native ecosystems. The introduction of the Norway Maple, which is an invasive species, into North America exemplifies the dangers of non-native species used in ornamental capacities. The Norway Maple prevents native North American trees from growing, or displaces native greenery by establishing a monotypic population. Once an area has been dominantly populated by the Norway Maple, a large canopy creates a heavy shade, making it difficult for other plants to survive. However, Milarch disagrees and argues that Redwoods are “non-invasive trees. They don’t travel.” Yet, while Redwoods do not travel as invasive species, their height and root systems grant them an advantage in competition for sunlight and soil.

As Archangel is a not-for-profit organization, their recently planted forest in Port Orford, Oregon will be protected from commercial activities. Milarch confirms the new forest in Port Orford “will never be cut down.” However, David Milarch expressed that they are also looking to encourage sustainable development efforts.

When it comes to sustainable development forests, “we would like some,” says Milarch. The establishment of sustainable forests entails that trees are planted very densely. As trees grow, they require more room for root systems and branch spread. To accommodate these needs, excess trees are harvested. Sustainable development forests are primarily commercial enterprises that have an emphasis of ethical care of forests. Whether the trees are planted in protected forests, or used for sustainable development, the old-growth Redwoods show a lot of promise.

David Milarch is hopeful that the forest in Port Orford, Oregon will act as a model in reforestation efforts to combat global warming. However, while this initiative seeks to reduce the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, rising CO2 emissions continue to perpetuate the original problem. The United States continues to be one of the leading greenhouse gas emitters, and fossil fuel combustion constitutes 90 percent of greenhouse gases.

The organization Carbon Monitoring for Action has documented that the Scherer Plant of Southern Co. emits an estimated 23,861,000 tons of CO2 annually, making it the highest producer of greenhouse gases for all United States power plants. This problem is worsened by the limited legislation in place holding energy corporations accountable for their pollution. While during his first term President Obama introduced regulatory legislation using his authority under the Clean Air Act, some critics, including the Sierra Club’s Jenna Garland, claim that it does not go far enough, lamenting the fact that it requires only that power plants exceeding 75,000 tons of greenhouse gas emissions per year must submit to regulation.

While there has been skepticism that the mere planting of trees can save the Earth from dramatic climate changes, Archangel is certain that they have found the solution. Milarch urges that reforestation must be adopted globally, and that long-living Redwoods need to be planted everywhere: in cities, neighborhoods and parks, not just secluded locations. What is certain however, is that with the current rate of pollution, every little effort counts.

Source: http://www.theinternational.org/articles/346-redwood-forests-can-reforestation-effort

climate change and deforestation

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems. Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support.

Fighting Climate Change, Wildlife Extinction

Reforestation, Forest Conservation, Wildlife Conservation 

Sacred Seedlings is fighting climate change, while defending ecosystems, one forest at a time. We are a reforestation and forest conservation program developed by, and for, indigenous people around the globe.

Tanzania and Kenya wildlife conservation

Our reforestation program will help offset carbon build-up in the atmosphere and help curb climate change, while reforesting and healing the earth. It also promotes forest conservation.

  • Offset carbon buildup and minimize energy consumption.
  • Reforest public lands and private property around the globe.
  • Generate jobs. 

Those who have always lived closest to the earth, and respected it the most, are putting their expertise and passion to work to help save the planet and their cultures for future generations. We are accepting applications for reforestation and forest conservation projects.

reforest Tanzania

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems. Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support.

reforestation and climate change solution

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems. Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com